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Look at the sun rising over the sea.

Do you think that there is an omission of 'which is' between 'the sun' and 'rising over the sea' like 'Look at the sun which is rising over the sea'.

What do you native English speakers think? Thank you so much as usual in advance.

Comments  
Hans51Do you think that there is an omission of 'which is' between 'the sun' and 'rising over the sea' like 'Look at the sun which is rising over the sea'.

No. "Rising" carries all the import needed. If I wanted to paraphrase, it would be more like "Look at the sun as it rises over the sea."

Thank you so much!

How about this sentence, 'Look at the boy dancing on the stage'?

I think that two interpretations are possible like

1) Look at the boy who is dancing on the stage.

2) Look at him dancing on the stage. Here, 'dancing on the stage' functions as an object complement like I see you go or going.

However, I think that both sentences carry the same meaning, though. What do you think? Thank you so much as usual.

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Hans51How about this sentence, 'Look at the boy dancing on the stage'?

Tricky. There is only one sun, so the other interpretation did not arise. You probably are singling out the boy who was dancing. The ambiguity is in the verb "look at", and "look at" defaults to "turn your eyes upon". This weighs heavily in favor of "Look at the boy who is dancing on the stage." "Look at him" puts us back in the case of the sun, because there is only one him.

The natural way to say the other thing is "Watch the boy on the stage dance."