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I looked at the dictionary for those two, and it ... that feels like an adjective use to me, not adverb.

MW3NID says that, but the OED says that "backwards" is also an adjective, albeit obsolete and rare. I think this ... sounds too much like an adjective to me to use it here, but "forward" sounds like both adjective and adverb.

From COD5
-ward(s)
.... -ward & -wards are so nearly syn. that no hard & fast rules can be given for their use; it is largely a matter of indiom & euphony; e.g. -wards is required when manner is indicated as well as direction of movement, as 'to walk backwards'; we say 'a forward (adj.) movement', 'to come forward' (adv.) but 'it is moving forwards, not backwards'. As living suff., -ward & -wards form extempore adjj. & advv., freq. more or less joc., as 'bankwards', 'bedward', etc.
Note the words above delimited by ' and ', are in italics in the original.
On 1 Jan 2004 12:38:12 GMT, CyberCypher
Actually, I perceive it not as pretentious, but ... almost always edit to "while". I may be wrong, though.

But you are a native speaker of BrE and I a native speaker of AmE, so I'd expect us to ... a few posters here, in AEU, and maybe in sci.lang (I don't know much about that NG) regularly use "whilst".

Mike is right in that 'whilst' is seen less frequently than it used to be, but low-status? How in hell does one measure status in this world? Maybe with Americans it's money, possibly old money. With Brits, since we've taxed most of the old money out of existence, it seems to be the honours system, which, according to the press this week, seems to be at the whim of civil servants!
Using words, or even speech in general, as an indicator of status, can be misleading. I've met lots of beautiful people who had beautiful clothes, manners and speech, but who were going nowhere in dead-end jobs, and lots of wealthy and successful people who had kept the accents and idioms of their birthplaces intact. One has only had to listen to, say, BBC Radio 4, and compare the variety of the speech one hears today with that of 3 or 4 decades ago to see how accents and dialects are less important now in determining status than they used to be.

wrmst rgrds
Robin Bignall
Quiet part of Hertfordshire
England
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Actually, I perceive it not as pretentious, but ... almost always edit to "while". I may be wrong, though.

But you are a native speaker of BrE and I a native speaker of AmE, so I'd expect us to ... a few posters here, in AEU, and maybe in sci.lang (I don't know much about that NG) regularly use "whilst".

I think I mainly use 'whilst' when 'while' means 'whereas'; I would never use it in a time sense (I think).

Rob Bannister
Also sprach Dr Robin Bignall:
Mike is right in that 'whilst' is seen less frequently than it used to be, but low-status? How in hell ... decades ago to see how accents and dialects are less important now in determining status than they used to be.

We see that from the above that you measure status by wealth and occupation ("going nowhere in dead-end jobs" v. "wealthy and successful").

You shouldn't be misled. How do I view status? Dunno. I try to appreciate that different people are happy doing different things, and that every task on the job market is a job that society wants or needs doing.
Simon R. Hughes
Finally getting Linux up and running!
Also sprach Dr Robin Bignall:

Mike is right in that 'whilst' is seen less frequently ... important now in determining status than they used to be.

We see that from the above that you measure status by wealth and occupation ("going nowhere in dead-end jobs" v. ... doing different things, and that every task on the job market is a job that society wants or needs doing.

I've never heard 'whilst' used in speech or written by an American. Whenever I see it, I assume the writer is British.

As for status, in the US the matter is extremely complex, and is impossible to define. It's like pornography I can't define it, but I know it when I see it.
Carter Jefferson
http://carterj.homestead.com /
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Whilst (BrE equivalent of "While" and equally acceptable alternative, unless, ... BrE, in which case it is a bit pretentious)

Actually, I perceive it not as pretentious, but in current use, at any rate as a rather low-status alternative, and almost always edit to "while". I may be wrong, though.

I don't know about "low status" - I find "whilst" distinctly old- fashioned, like perhaps "unto".
In my own speech I used to use "while" for the temporal meaning and "whilst" to mean "although". But I sensed that few people, if any, made or understood that distinction. For that reason, and to avoid ambiguity, I no longer use "whilst" *or* "while" to mean "although". And when editing I change "while" or "whilst" to "although" wherever it is possible to do so.

Mike Barnes
Cheshire, England
Simon R. Hughes Finally getting Linux up and running!

Not that I ever thought I would have to talk to you, but which flavour are you using?

Ayaz Ahmed Khan
Yours Forever in,
Cyberspace.
http://adic.netfirms.com/fastce/home.html
Also sprach Dr Robin Bignall: We see that from the ... market is a job that society wants or needs doing.

I've never heard 'whilst' used in speech or written by an American. Whenever I see it, I assume the writer is British.

I would assume that, too.
As for status, in the US the matter is extremely complex, and is impossible to define. It's like pornography I can't define it, but I know it when I see it.

Yes, I suspect many of us feel that way about it in our various countries. In fact, to my mind, status is only recognised by people who think it's important - either those who don't have much and want to improve, or those who have and want to protect it.
(BTW, I went to the local library, which to my astonishment was open today, for last year they closed from Christmas Eve to the first working day after the New Year) and as you might guess, all copies of 'The Quiet American' were out on loan. So I went to the local bookshop, ordered it, and will get it Monday.)

wrmst rgrds
Robin Bignall
Quiet part of Hertfordshire
England
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Also sprach Ayaz Ahmed Khan:
Simon R. Hughes Finally getting Linux up and running!

Not that I ever thought I would have to talk to you, but which flavour are you using?

You don't have to talk to me.

Simon R. Hughes
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