Hello,
Most English words have European origin: specifically, from Germanic, French, Latin, Greek, etc. I'm interested in finding English words whose origins are elsewhere. (Examples include chocolate, nadir, kvetch, etc.)
In theory I could go through my dictionary and look at the etymology of each word, one after the other. Has somebody already done that? Better yet, is such a guide online (i.e. free)?
If anyone cares to answer, please respond to the group and not to my email.
Thank you very much!
Ted Shoemaker
1 2 3
Most English words have European origin: specifically, from Germanic, French, Latin, Greek, etc. I'm interested in finding English words whose ... a guide online (i.e. free)? If anyone cares to answer, please respond to the group and not to my email.

This isn't quite what you're looking for, but it might help. If you have a dictionary on a CD-ROM that has an advanced search feature, (such as Bookshelf) you can search by nationality I just punched in "Indian" and it gave me a list of words that included 'seersucker' 'pariah' and 'dacoit.'
I'm not trying to be picky, I just need some clarfication: what do you mean by "European origin"?
You mentioned the word "kvetch" as an example of a word of non-European origin. As any dictionary can tell you, "kvetch" is an Yidish word, and Yidish is not Hebrew.
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Hello, Most English words have European origin: specifically, from Germanic, French, Latin, Greek, etc. I'm interested in finding English words ... anyone cares to answer, please respond to the group and not to my email. Thank you very much! Ted Shoemaker

Well, bungalow is an Indian word.
But isn't English an Indo-something language ?
Bob Martin
Hello, Most English words have European origin: specifically, from Germanic, French, Latin, Greek, etc. I'm interested in finding English words ... each word, one after the other. Has somebody already done that? Better yet, is such a guide online (i.e. free)?

Walter W. Skeat's " Concise Etymological Dictionary of the English Language" (Oxford, Clarendon Press, 1882 and later) is available in a cheap paperback reprint (Wordsworth?). My hardback 1978 imprint has several appendices, of which VI is title "Distribution of Words according to the Languages from which they are derived." Section 14., for example, lists about 105 words of Persian origin, with their path noted. An example of that notation is
"Dutch from Slavonic from Low Latin from Greek from Persian: gherkin" The Greek in this case, which checking the main entry for 'gherkin' tells us, is Byzantine Greek.
There are disagreements with such lists. The AHD4 listing for "gherkin" traces it "perhaps from Late Greek 'angourion'". The great Onions of OED fame is not that wishy-washy, being unequivocal in tracing it to "derv. with dim. suffix of late Gr. 'aggourion'," but does not get to the Persian, stating "ult. origin unknown."

Martin Ambuhl
How about, mostly food related:
"potato" from batata, papa, Inca.
barbecue, from barbacoa, Taino through Spanish.
tortilla, as understood by Mexicans, (tortilla in Spanish is omelette), as well as other Mexican words such as tamale, frijole (Spanish: poroto), tomato (Aztec tomatl), chiclet, totem (pole), couscous, sarape (zarape), etc.

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Hello, Most English words have European origin: specifically, from Germanic, French, Latin, Greek, etc. I'm interested in finding English words ... anyone cares to answer, please respond to the group and not to my email. Thank you very much! Ted Shoemaker

I think "amok" as in "to run amok" is Indonesian.
Berko
I think "amok" as in "to run amok" is Indonesian.

My dictionary says it's Malay. It also thinks that, in English at any rate, "amuck" is the earliest spelling.
Matti
Hello, Most English words have European origin: specifically, from Germanic, French, Latin, Greek, etc. I'm interested in finding English words whose origins are elsewhere. (Examples include chocolate, nadir, kvetch, etc.)

Raccoon.
Brian Rodenborn
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