Hello all!
Would anybody know who wrote this, and when?

(the weariest river)
From too much love of living,
Fom hope and fear set free,
We thank with breif thanksgiving
Whatever gods may be
That no life lives forever,
That dead men rise up never,
That even the weariest river
Winds somewhere to sea

Thank you!
Algernon Charles Swinburne 1837 -1909 "The Garden of Proserpine". This is the penultimate verse.

This is the verse in question.

From too much hope of living,
From hope and fear set free,
We thank with brief thanksgiving
Whatever gods may be
That no life lives for ever;
That dead men rise up never;
That even the weariest river
Winds somewhere safe to sea.

The most famous line is "winds somewhere safe to sea", and that's how I found it.
Thanks, Abbie, I had forgotten the "safe"... (shame on me, but it was a "by heart"!)
I had googled the begining, to no avail...
I'll have to read the whole of it. I had found the quotation in a French novel, and I really loved it - though it's not very optimistic-
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
I have to ask, Pieanne: which novelist quotes Swinburne? (Proust? Huysmans?)

What an intriguing subject, by the way: 'Looking for a poet...' (I was expecting to see an hourly rate and some terms and conditions.)

MrP
Hello, MrP.!
It's André Maurois, "Climats". I read it a long time ago, but the quotation somehow stuck in my memory. I like its "weary" tempo.
I chose my title on purpose, I thought it wouldn't go unnoticed! Emotion: smile
it is Jack London in Martin Eden
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies