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Context:

A: “That dog looks a lot like your dog.” (Opinion)

C: "No it doesn't Person B's dog is bigger." (Opinion)

B: “Oh shoot! That’s looks like my dog because that is my dog!”


“A lot like” means similar, but not identical, so why is the person saying “that’s because”? Shouldn’t it be “no, it does not like my dog, because that is my dog.”


Also, does this make Person A’s opinion correct or incorrect?

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Forgive me for saying so, but I think you are over-thinking a little bit of dialogue that just seems meant to be mildly amusing.

Are people who speak in your native language always very precise in everrythng they say?

Clive

Comments  

It should come as no surprise if a thing looks like itself. You could even expect it to look a lot like itself. Seeing is not always believing. Maybe he's muddy. Maybe he's far away. Maybe it's foggy out.

You are right, of course, but that's what makes the exchange funny, a little.

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 Clive's reply was promoted to an answer.

Hi Clive, I know I am.

I'm just curious about the terminology of "look like". Does "looks like" mean similar, but not identical? Does it just mean sharing characterstics?

Does "looks like" mean similar, but not identical? I would say usually, yes.

It refers to physical looks, not to characteristics.

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Thanks for the reply, Clive.

I have one issue. If "looks like" means similar, but not identical, then why do I sometimes hear this conversation?

A: “That dog looks a lot like your dog.” (Opinion that refers to the physical looks of Dog A to Dog B saying that they are similar, but not identical)

B: “Oh shoot! That’s looks like my dog because that is my dog!” (This statement says that the person's opinion is correct because that is "his" dog, but doesn't this change the meaning of "looks like" then?)

Hi Clive,

There's no need to reply. I'm trying to not overthink things anymore.