Thought I'd start a new thread on Briticisms which have been (mostly) displaced by Americanisms. Can you think of any more? Or point to questionable items?
Accumulator: car battery
Billion: originally 'large' (10^12), now 'small' (10^9) Fount: as typeface, now usually 'font'
Gangway: as a passage between seats in a theatre etc., now largely displaced by 'aisle'
Quitted: past of 'quit' is now usually 'quit' Sparking plug: spark plug
Wireless: radio
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Thought I'd start a new thread on Briticisms which have been (mostly) displaced by Americanisms. Can you think of any more? Or point to questionable items? Accumulator: car battery Billion: originally 'large' (10[/nq]^12), now 'small' (10^9)
Fount: as typeface, now usually 'font' Gangway: as a passage between seats in a theatre etc., now largely displaced by 'aisle' Quitted: past of 'quit' is now usually 'quit' Sparking plug: spark plug Wireless: radio

I'd like to know when you think they were lost. Except for billion and fount I've never used these so-called Briticisms nor heard them being used, even while living in Britain from 1971 to 1992, with the partial exception of "wireless", which I associate with people at least 30 or 40 years older than me.
It seems to me thet what you have here is a list of terms from the pre-World War II period which fell out of use, but not necessarily because of American influence.
Regards, Einde O'Callaghan
Thought I'd start a new thread on Briticisms which have been (mostly) displaced by Americanisms. Can you think of any more? Or point to questionable items? Accumulator: car battery Billion: originally 'large' (10[/nq]^12), now 'small' (10^9)
Fount: as typeface, now usually 'font' Gangway: as a passage between seats in a theatre etc., now largely displaced by 'aisle' Quitted: past of 'quit' is now usually 'quit' Sparking plug: spark plug Wireless: radio

I think you're making assertions unsupported by research. 'accumulator', for instance, wasn't used exclusively (or, IIRC, generally) for a car battery. OED points to various uses of the term:
And 'battery' for an electrical component was in use here before the USA existed.
'gangway' and 'aisle' have co-existed for a long time.

On 'quit' OED says
'Radio' was in use here from the earliest days - which is why the BBC called its listings magazine 'Radio Times', not 'Wireless Times', when it was first published in 1923

John 'etc' Dean
Oxford
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Thought I'd start a new thread on Briticisms which have ... to questionable items? Accumulator: car battery Billion: originally 'large' (10[/nq]^12), now 'small' (10^9)
Fount: as typeface, now usually 'font' Gangway: as a passage ... is now usually 'quit' Sparking plug: spark plug Wireless: radio

I'd like to know when you think they were lost. Except for billion and fount I've never used these so-called ... of terms from the pre-World War II period which fell out of use, but not necessarily because of American influence.

Why did they fall out of use, if not because of AmE influence? Several of those terms were well-established in AmE long before World War II.

Mind you, I don't approve of postwar British US-ophilia.
^12), now 'small' (10^9)
I'd like to know when you think they were lost. ... out of use, but not necessarily because of American influence.

Why did they fall out of use, if not because of AmE influence? Several of those terms were well-established in AmE long before World War II. Mind you, I don't approve of postwar British US-ophilia.

Words come into and fall out of use for all sorts of reasons. Anyway John Dean has provided evidence from that several of these words aren't particularly American anyway.
Regards, Einde O'Callaghan
Thought I'd start a new thread on Briticisms which have been (mostly) displaced by Americanisms. Can you think of any more? Or point to questionable items? Accumulator: car battery Billion: originally 'large' (10[/nq]^12), now 'small' (10^9)
Fount: as typeface, now usually 'font' Gangway: as a passage between seats in a theatre etc., now largely displaced by 'aisle' Quitted: past of 'quit' is now usually 'quit' Sparking plug: spark plug Wireless: radio

Gramophone: iPod

John H
Yorkshire, England
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I think you're making assertions unsupported by research. 'accumulator', for instance, wasn't used exclusively (or, IIRC, generally) for a car battery. OED points to various uses of the term:

(snip dictionary entry with sundry meanings of "accumulator")
And 'battery' for an electrical component was in use here before the USA existed.

The battery was invented in 1800. What "electrical component" did the term you mention refer to?
Don
Kansas City
I'm not sure to what extent these have been displaced.
Accumulator: car battery

When I was kid, accumulators were common. They weren't much like car batteries (physically - I guess they were chemically indentical). Their most common use was to power wireless sets in houses (in rural areas) that didn't have mains electricity.
Billion: originally 'large' (10[/nq]^12), now 'small' (10^9)

Many UK people distinguish between "US billion" and "UK billion" as different numbers. Some of us refuse to use the word with such distinction, in order to avoid confusion.
Fount: as typeface, now usually 'font'

I'm not convinced that "fount" was ever used in this sense outside the printing industry, where (I'm told by people who know more than I about such matters) its use was not identical to the present-day computer-based use of the word "font". I don't know whether the few surviving moveable-print printers still use the word "fount".
Gangway: as a passage between seats in a theatre etc., now largely displaced by 'aisle'

I think the two uses exist side-by-side in the UK at the moment.
Quitted: past of 'quit' is now usually 'quit'

I've never come across "quitted".
Sparking plug: spark plug

Was "spark plug" US in origin? I'd have geussed that both uses were once common in the UK, but "spark plug" is now much more common than "sparking plug".
Wireless: radio

"Radio" certainly wasn't solely US in origin. It was the recognised name of the system from its very beginning, with "wireless" as a popular alternative that fell out of use (well, largely, it's still used a bit).
Thought I'd start a new thread on Briticisms which have ... to questionable items? Accumulator: car battery Billion: originally 'large' (10[/nq]^12), now 'small' (10^9)
Fount: as typeface, now usually 'font' Gangway: as a passage ... is now usually 'quit' Sparking plug: spark plug Wireless: radio

Gramophone: iPod

Where are we on the American "fit" and the British "fitted" for the preterit and past participle of "fit"?
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