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I'm loving it. (Macdonald's)

I know this expression is fine; it's almost like you're enjoying it. But what about this one?

I'm loving you all.

Is it also accptable? Or is it not, regardless of context?
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Comments  
The 'regardless of context' certainly throws in a monkey wrench.
Dear Taka,

It is my opinion that «it» is a hamburger. Therefore the state of love is finite. It means «enjoyment». It will end when the hamburger has been eaten. It is therefore possible to use the present progressive.

It is also my opinion that «all» is people. Therefore the state of love is not finite. It does not mean «enjoyment». It is therefore not possible to use the present progressive.

It is however possible that a person may speak metaphorically. He may then apply a phrase that is applicable to hamburgers also to people. Emotion: smile

Kind regards, Emotion: smile

Goldmund
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TakaI'm loving it. (Macdonald's)

I know this expression is fine; it's almost like you're enjoying it. But what about this one?

I'm loving you all.

Is it also accptable? Or is it not, regardless of context?
Actually, I have problem with the McDonald's expression. I would say 'loving' as a verb, is mostly colloquial.
Anonymous 'loving' as a verb, is mostly colloquial.

I don't really think so, or is it, native speakers?
I'm loving this and that, is something that I think I've only heard since the launch of the MacD's campaign and it sounded odd at first to my UK ears. It sounds like the sort of English useage you find in Indian speakers (not that there is anything wrong with that) but it didn't sound British to me! It's everywhere now though as it's becoming a bit of a catch phrase.

Oh...just remembered...there was a song out about 5 years ago with the words 'We're loving it, loving it, loving it, we're loving it like this, We're loving it, loving it, loving it, we're loving it like that' that was quite popular and 'We're loving it' said in the same way as in the song became a bit of a catch phrase for a couple of months. It caught people's attention because it seemed unusual.
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nona,

I think somthing like 'I'm glad my husband is back and our children are loving every minute of it' is totally acceptable. Or is it not to your British ears?
Merriam-Webster gives the inflected form 'loving' for the transitive verb 'love'. I think it's good for more contexts than hamburgers and fries.
Takanona,

I think somthing like 'I'm glad my husband is back and our children are loving every minute of it' is totally acceptable. Or is it not to your British ears?

I have a British ear and the McDonald's expression doesn't sound correct. However, the example you gave sounds fine. That possibly could be because of 'every minute'.

Forgive me as I have a cold and I can't think too intensely at the moment, but I would say that, in the McDonalds example, 'loving' isn't an action else who/what is the recipient? If it is a hamburger does this mean the hamburger is being pampered and taken care of?

'Loving', in such a context, is a feeling caused by the hamburger and it doesn't have a continuous anymore than the expression 'I am needing', because there is no single action to continue. Your example, on the other hand, refers to several instances of that feeling, 'every minute' and therefore sounds correct to the ear.
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