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To Sam, love is second/secondary to bread.
Simon loves his work. To him, work always comes first, and family and friends are second/secondary.

Hi,
Do both second and secondary fit in the above two samples mean about the same to you? Thanks.
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I'd use secondary to ..., but second in contrast to first.
If you want to use an informal idiom, you can say that love takes a back seat to work.
CJ
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Angliholic "When it comes to swimming, Phelps is second to none." So, how should I decide to use second or secondary before "to?"
"Second" here means "second place."

When comparing swimmers, there is no one who could be considered in first place overall, thereby relegating Phelps to second place. "Second to none" is actually a fixed expression.

When compared to his work, Sam's family is secondary (unimportant). It comes second. It's secondary to his work. His work is first and his family is second. The horse ran second to King Henry. The horse ran second behind King Henry. (like) I play Iago to my brother's Othello.

Clearly, as CJ says, "Love is secondary to bread," NOT "Love is second to bread."

- A.
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Comments  
CalifJim I'd use secondary to ..., but second in contrast to first.

If you want to use an informal idiom, you can say that love takes a back seat to work.

CJ

Thanks, CJ.
But I'm still confused in one aspect, that is, once in a while I run across sentences like "When it comes to swimming, Phelps is second to none." So, how should I decide to use second or secondary before "to?" Thanks again.
 Avangi's reply was promoted to an answer.
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Thanks, Avangi.
But I still don't get it. It sounds perfectly good to me to say "To Sam, love is second to bread."
AngliholicIt sounds perfectly good to me to say "To Sam, love is second to bread."
It's not ungrammatical, but, as I said, I would use secondary in this particular sentence. Maybe this is because I am not used to comparisons in which love and bread are directly compared.
CJ