+0
What does the phrase M. told S. mean? Do the M and S stand for anything?

M. told S. that he's got loads of interesting anecdotes about his adventures.
+0
I would say that they are used to replace names.
Maybe M=Mary and S= Steve
e.g. Mary told Steve that he's got loads of.....
It depends on the context, what came before, what comes after.
1 2
Comments  
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
You are right but i should say we need a context. Who is he? We would need to know who they are talking about.
or
Mary told Steve she's got loads of...
Woodward - I don't think they are used to replace names (there are no such names in the context, and I'm not sure the context really helps.) The phrase is used in the following notes made by a club secretary.

NOTES

Write to all members to make them feel at home and to give them the latest details about all the activities coming up soon.

Mention:

* Talk by James Dixon 'Sailing Round the World'. (M. told S. that he's got some fantastic video film as well as loads of interesting anecdotes about his adventures.) Push for a good turnout, otherwise it looks bad - he's put off a meeting with another group to speak to us.

Could it be an idiom meaning something like 'it is said that he's got...??
Having investigated further, I discovered that letters are used to replace names to protect the identities of the people involved in court cases

Evidence presented at trial tended to show that defendant was married to his third wife, and had a child from each of his priortwo marriages. Defendant's daughter (herein “M”) was born on 26 March 1983; his son (herein “S”) was born 29 August 1984. Apparently, defendant spent little time with the children during their formative years. However, when M was twelve and S was eleven, the two began spending weekends with defendant, and thereafter in the summer of 1996 defendant gained custody of S. Significantly, S “had a history of behavioral and psychological difficulties.

Interview with Mother, M. M told S that one night while giving V a bath, V started to cry while M was....

I found the origin of your question 'Register Cloze' but it is difficult to see why they use it. Maybe it is just a generalization to say that one person told another person something for the student activity.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Interview with Mother,M. M told S that one night while giving V a bath, V started to cry while M was ....

I don't understand the rule. Why not M. M. told S. that one night while giving V. a bath, V. started to cry while M. was....

What or who is V?

WHAT A CV!
There is no rule.
It can be a random letter or the first letter of the name.
It's not used much as it is often confusing. Usually in court cases to avoid releasing the true identity of the victim or the person accused of the crime.
V is just a random letter that appears in a true court case transcript.
Shouldn't the rule be applied to all or none?
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
How do you mean?
Show more