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Maggie the cat, as well as Scarlett, is one of the most memorable charcters I've ever known on movies.

Is this sentence OK?

Thank You
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characters

You may want "along with Scarlett" and then say "two of the most memorable..."

It's odd to list two characters and say "one."

And presumably the people reading this will know who Maggie and Scarlett are, since you give no context about what movies they are in.
... I've ever known in movies.
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Hi guys,

. . . I've ever known . . .

It's also somewhat unidiomatic to speak of 'knowing' characters in the movies. More common words would include 'seen', 'encountered'.

Best wishes, Clive
CliveHi guys,

. . . I've ever known . . .

It's also somewhat unidiomatic to speak of 'knowing' characters in the movies. More common words would include 'seen', 'encountered'.

Best wishes, Clive
With that, saying "... I've ever known of..." would probably also resolve this.
Hi,

'Known of' still doesn't sound idiomatic to me. More natural would be something like

Maggie the cat and Scarlett are some of the most memorable characters I've ever seen in the movies.


or I think some of my most memorable movie characters are Maggie the cat and Scarlett.


Best wishes, Clive
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Well, I've commonly heard things along the lines of "Have you heard Sami Bjorken before?" "No, but I've heard of her." These then imply completely different meanings--one person has heard Miss Bjorken sing while the other has only heard of the name 'Sami Bjorken.' My hears make the same distinction for 'known' and 'known of.'
Hi again,

In your examples, it sounds like Sami Bjorken is a real person. Scarlett and Maggie are not real people.

If I know Scarlett, in normal usage this means I have met her.

If I know of her, it means I haven't met her but I have some information about her.

You can't meet Scarlett or Maggie. That's why neither form works well when I am talking about non-real characters I have seen in a movie.

Best wishes, Clive
I know, I probably missed my chance to weigh in on this when I made the comment in the beginning and didn't look at this portion of the sentence.

But I'm going to throw my vote in with Clive. You don't really "know" characters from a movie. I suppose someone who has done a study of a book or movie for a thesis may claim to know them, due to intense study, but in the common sense, they are characters you've seen, or you've heard of, or who were portrayed, but not known.
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