Hi Teachers,

There are three main type of questions in English among others:

Information questions

Yes questions

No questions

My question is, can I say 'wh-questions' or just 'questions' instead of 'information questions'?

Thank in advance
1 2 3
1. three main types of questions

2. Are you defining the types of questions according to what kind of answer they require?

3. If you need "among others", it is not in the right place.
Hi canadian45,

Thank you for your reply.

1. thank you.

2. Yes I am.

3. There are also tag questions, subject questions, object questions, and indirect questions. That's what I meant using 'among others'.

TS
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Thinking Spain1. thank you.2. Yes I am.3. There are also tag questions, subject questions, object questions, and indirect questions.
That's what I meant using 'among others'. TS
I see.

But because you have "three main types", "among others" is optional'.

"three main types" itself tells us that there are other types of questions. But if you want to use "among others", it has to relate to "three....questions", not to "in English".

There are (among others) three main types of questions in English.

'yes questions' and 'no questions' are not two types of questions.

If there were something called a 'yes question', meaning that it requires a 'yes' answer, there wouldn't really be a question. So, 'yes or no' is one kind of question.

My question is, can I say 'wh-questions' or just 'questions' instead of 'information questions'?

Say 'questions requiring information'. Also, 'wh' questions don't include 'How' questions.

If you wish, I can tell you why the 'sentence' with the colon in your first post is not correct.

Actually, you should tell me what some of the problems with that 'sentence' are.
canadian45'wh' questions don't include 'How' questions.
Actually, in most grammar books and in linguistics circles "how" counts as a wh word. (Odd, maybe, but the function is the same.) Call it an honorary member of the group if you want. In any case, when grammar books use the term wh-question they do include howquestions. Emotion: smile

CJ
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CalifJim
canadian45'wh' questions don't include 'How' questions.
Actually, in most grammar books and in linguistics circles "how" counts as a wh word. (Odd, maybe, but the function is the same.) Call it an honorary member of the group if you want. In any case, when grammar books use the term wh-question they do include how questions.

CJ
Thanks, that's good to know.Emotion: smile

But it extends the question further. Are the following questions as written wh-word questions?

Since when....

In what way....

For what reason....
canadian45But it extends the question further. Are the following questions as written wh-word questions?
Since when..
In what way..

For what reason..
I'm afraid so. Strange as it may seem, that's the standard interpretation of "whquestions". Emotion: sad

In fact, any direct question that is not a "Yes-No" question is a wh question.

CJ
Hi Canadian45,

Thank you for your detailed reply.
canadian45If you wish, I can tell you why the 'sentence' with the colon in your first post is not correct.
Yes I would like to know it.

This is the sentence, isn't it?

There are three main types of questions in English among others:

Information questions

Yes questions

No questions

Actually, you should tell me what some of the problems with that 'sentence' are.

Well, one of them was the position of 'among others', but you have already corrected; the other one was the 's'.

Besides these ones I don't really know it.Emotion: sad
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