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When you hear "The majority cultivates the minority" without any context, what comes to your mind first? Is "cultivate" here a negative meaning or positive meaning?

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thanks3

When you hear "The majority cultivates the minority" without any context, what comes to your mind first? Is "cultivate" here a negative meaning or positive meaning?

cultivates ~ influences (or maybe tries to influence)

It's neither positive nor negative.

That's what comes to my mind first without context.


I don't know, though, what you're going to learn from anyone's guesses about a five-word sentence out of context. That same sentence could have a completely different meaning in different contexts. Still, it might help a little.

CJ

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Thank you, Mr. CJ again Emotion: smile

Yea, you're right! I understand contexts are very important, too.

I am just curious about the way native speakers think and I want to know what they are thinking concerning a certain word, phrase or sentence from, sometimes, out of context. And every time I run into a 'strange' sentences, I can't help trying to figure them out. That's why I keep bothering you and other native speakers:) And I always feel thankful for you guys' devoted help.


While I'm at it, can I ask you another favor? I posted a question yesterday, but I didn't get any answer. Would you check it for me? The question was the following.

Q. What does a waiter shout when food is ready in a restaurant? I mean, which is right between the three below?

"Order's up!" or "Orders up!" or "Order up!"

thanks3Q. What does a waiter shout when food is ready in a restaurant? I mean, which is right between the three below?
"Order's up!" or "Orders up!" or "Order up!"

You can't shout an apostrophe, so it can't be the first. Emotion: wink

And I don't think I've heard waiters shout anything like that. Usually it's the cook who knows if an order is ready for the waiter to take to the customer, so the cook might say one of those things — or even something else. It seems that each of these establishments has its own lingo or codes for these things.

Besides, in a very high-class restaurants, you won't hear any shouting at all, so who knows what they say or do.

This is quite a niche question. Maybe someone who has worked in restaurants will come by and give you a better answer than I have done.

CJ

Yea, right. It would be a cook that shouts that, not a waiter. I heard that expression in an audio footage for English listening practice. The conversation sounded like happening in a fast food restaurant, not a fancy one. The dialogue was as follows.

A: (maybe a cook says) Order's up! (or Orders up!) (and then a sound of bell, "Ring, ring"!)

B: Oh, that' us

Thanks again:)

Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
thanks3Order's up! or Orders up!

It could be either one.

One order is ready: Order's up. (The order is up.)
More than one order is ready: Orders up. (The orders are up.)

But I think you knew that already. Emotion: wink

CJ

Now I'm perfectly clear! Thank you again Emotion: smile