+1

Hello, everyone!!

He teaches his students in his ways to make creative juices flowing.

For the usage ’flowing’ in above sentence I have following questions;

1. Since the causative ‘make’ doesn’t allow participle form after its object, the ‘make’ should, I think, be substituted with ‘get’.

2. By the way, if we view above sentence in another point that the ‘flowing’ might be an adjective originated from verb ‘flow’ and this sentence pattern is the same as “make someone happy”, could this sentence with ‘make’ itself be grammatical?

While, of course, my opinion is no.1, your various clarifications will be really appreciated.

Thanking in advance and Best RGDS,

Comments  

Hi

1. This is correct. The expression almost always has the verb 'get':

- The aim of his teaching is to get the creative juices flowing.

2. It is just about possible to use 'make' if you follow with the present form:

- He aims to make the creative juices flow.

The first one is more usual

Hope this helps

Dave

dave_anon

Hi

1. This is correct. The expression almost always has the verb 'get':

- The aim of his teaching is to get the creative juices flowing.

2. It is just about possible to use 'make' if you follow with the present form:

- He aims to make the creative juices flow.

The first one is more usual

Hope this helps

Dave

dave_anon, thank you for your answer.

While I have noted your reply, would you please clarify again;

1. This sentence itself - 'He teaches his students in his ways to make creative juices flowing.' - could make sense without grammatical problem?

2. If no problem, how do you evaluate above 'flowing', adjective or present participle?

Best RGDS,

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Hi

I'm afraid the short answer is, I don't know exactly how to classify the -ing word ...

- The waters of our river are rising

The word 'rising' here is a present participle, but it is also being used as an adjective. I would say either naming of the word is correct, but maybe others have a different view

As said before, you cannot use the present participle with 'make' - you have to use the present simple:

- It's the heavy rain that has made the waters rise

You definitely would not say 'rising' there

- He teaches his students in his ways to make creative juices flowing

I have to say, no, that's not a good sentence: the participle does not work there. It has to be 'flow'

Hope this helps

Dave

dave_anonAs said before, you cannot use the present participle with 'make' - you have to use the present simple:- It's the heavy rain that has made the waters rise

I agree with the verb forms used in the sentence. I'll just mention that 'rise' is not the present simple. It's a bare infinitive, which some grammarians also call the plain infinitive. Whichever term you prefer, it implies that the 'to' particle is missing before the infinitive.

The complete infinitive with 'to' is used if 'make' is in the passive voice: They were made to answer twice.

CB

Hi CB

Yes, I agree: not the present simple, the bare infinitive. It is the 'to' form and sometimes the 'to' is left out, sometimes put in

- The heavy rain, that's what makes the waters to rise.

We usually omit the 'to' in that sentence; but, yes, I understand the point you make

Thanks

Dave

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dave_anon

Hi

I'm afraid the short answer is, I don't know exactly how to classify the -ing word ...

- The waters of our river are rising

The word 'rising' here is a present participle, but it is also being used as an adjective. I would say either naming of the word is correct, but maybe others have a different view

As said before, you cannot use the present participle with 'make' - you have to use the present simple:

- It's the heavy rain that has made the waters rise

You definitely would not say 'rising' there

- He teaches his students in his ways to make creative juices flowing

I have to say, no, that's not a good sentence: the participle does not work there. It has to be 'flow'

Hope this helps

Dave

dave_anon, thanks for your 2nd reply.


Best RGDS,

Cool BreezeI agree with the verb forms used in the sentence. I'll just mention that 'rise' is not the present simple. It's a bare infinitive, which some grammarians also call the plain infinitive. Whichever term you prefer, it implies that the 'to' particle is missing before the infinitive.The complete infinitive with 'to' is used if 'make' is in the passive voice: They were made to answer twice.CB

Hello, Cool Breeze, appreciate your explanation.


Best RGDS,