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1) "He makes it clear that the kind of skepticism dealt with in this chapter is not the same as that examined in the third."

2) "But he makes clear that precariousness is a permanent feature of our intellectual lives".

In 2) is it not necessary to use "it" as in 1)? Or, rather, is it not necessary to delete "it" in 1) as in 2)?

Sextus
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I was taught we have to write "make it clear that" at least in formal writing, but it seems now even people like NYTimes reporters use both collocations in their writing.

paco
Both possible...
[Y]
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I'm surprised by the google count. I'd only use the "make it clear" version myself.

MrP
Well, one can always learn new things, P.

Sextus
Yes...though in a way, I rather wish I hadn't learnt that one.

Ah well.
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"It is clear that ..." > "He makes it clear that ..." is the standard transform, isn't it?
I suspect that "clear", for whatever reason, is exceptional in its "make clear that" incarnation.

Are there any other adjectives that, in the position occupied by "clear", would also allow both forms, i.e., with or without the "it"?

"It is doubtful that ..." > "This newly discovered information makes it doubtful that ..."
"It is doubtful that ..." > *?"This newly discovered information makes doubtful that ..."

CJ
CalifJim"It is clear that ..." > "He makes it clear that ..." is the standard transform, isn't it?
I suspect that "clear", for whatever reason, is exceptional in its "make clear that" incarnation.
Yes; it has the air of a slightly off-centre translation of "préciser", for some reason.

MrP