+0
Hello, teachers!

Would you please tell me if these sentences are well-formed? Do we use both 'make sure of it' and 'make it sure' with the same meaning?

1. Did you turn off the oven? / Yes, I did. / [Make sure of it right now.] or [Make it sure right now.]
2. If you get A on this math test, I'll buy you a brand-new computer. / Really? Can you [make sure of it, make it sure]? / Yes, sure!

Thank you very much.
Comments  
-- Did you turn off the oven?
-- Yes, I did.
-- Could you make sure?

["Make sure of it right now" is rather abrupt and almost rude, I'd say. "Make it sure right now" doesn't mean anything here. It's not correct.]

-- If you get an A on this math test, I'll buy you a brand-new computer.
-- Really? [Are you sure? / For sure?]
-- Yes, [I'm sure. / for sure.]

[Neither "Can you make sure of it?" nor "... make it sure?" really fit in this context.]

I'm more familiar with the expression "Make sure that ...".
-- Please make sure that you turn off the oven before you leave.

I've never heard "Make it sure".

Regards,
CJ
Hello Jandi

I'm a mere English learner but could you allow me to throw my 2 cents?

My conclusion is 'make it sure' is a wrong phrase. The adjective 'sure' [=confident] is always used to describe about a person. "Somebody is sure " or "Somebody is sure ". Here or works as the complement of 'sure'. 'Make sure' is also an intransitive idiomatic verb. It is used in the ways: (1)make sure of a noun, (2)or make sure that clause. I don't know how come 'make sure of/that' comes into English, but my guess is it would be originally 'make oneself sure of/that'. 'Make it sure' would be a phrase one wrongly makes taking 'make sure' as a transitive phrasal/idiomatic verb.

paco

[PS] After writing this, I found JC had already answered. So this posting is to duplicate Jim's much better answer. But, Jim, please allow me to put it.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Thank you very much, Paco!
How nice of you and your answer!

> The adjective 'sure' [=confident] is always used to describe about a person.
It is certain/sure that she loves you. [I think both are correct even though 'certain' is much more natural. And "It is a sure thing that she loves you" is also correct, I think.
Just my thoughts. ^^

Have a nice day, Paco!
Hello Jandi

I think you are a great sweet-talker. I like reading your suave responses to any people who answered to you.

Yes I was wrong. 'Sure' can modify things when it is used in the sense of 'reliable' or 'steady'. "It is a sure thing that ..." sounds a little archaic at least to me, though we can often hear native speakers exclaim "Sure thing!" in the sense of "Certainly" or "Indeed"

Enjoy spring days!

paco
Hello, Paco.
Thank you for your compliments and a good wish!

> to any people
Oh, no! To our good teachers only (I hope)! To those who answer ME!!!
And 'always' is almost always a dangerous word, isn't it?

I hope you are enjoying a peaceful evening!
Try out our live chat room.
Hello again

Yes, I know well the use of 'always' is dangerous. Still I am agreeable always when I am reading your message.

paco