1 2
I have occasionally edited texts for corporate types, and they are full of these $5-word abominations too.

I may have found this gere.
http://www.dack.com/web/***.html
jaybee
I have occasionally edited texts for corporate types, and they are full of these $5-word abominations too.

I may have found this gere.

Goly sgit. I meant to write "here".
jaybee
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Language inflation is a product of a lack of education.

It can also be a product of "too much" education, whatever that is.

I worked at a Public Television station for a long time. We had a contract with the State of Va. to produce educational programming for in- school use you know, the old "TV teacher" kind of stuff. (At least that's how it started. It got better.) Consequently, the director of Educational Programming was highly educated, with a doctorate in, would you believe, "Language Arts". She was a master of language inflation.

I remember her posting a job opening on the bulletin board for a secretarial position. The posting listed the job requirements. One of the requirements was:
"Open, read, and process mail on a daily basis"
She couldn't just write "Process daily mail". For some reason I suspect having to do with a sense of insecurity she had to inflate the language.
Why use three words when nine will do just as well?

Gene
I may have found this gere.

Goly sgit. I meant to write "here". jaybee

I have passed this on to some of my work colleagues who, along with me, write many scripts for the military. I'm sure we'll be able to monetize mission-critical e-services much better now. Thanks, jaybee!

Gene
@reader2.panix.com:
What's with the "looming" thing? "Silence looms." "Darkness looms." "Eddie's *** pet hamster looms." There's a whole lot of looming going on. Must have been the word of the week.

"We loom".
jaybee
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
I do know that some speakers of American English (I can't quite figure out what the definition of this group of speakers is doesn't equate to socio-economic or regional factors) who think that the word "woman" is a bit off-color that's an old idea in American English, I thought it was dead actually, but I hear a lot of younger speakers using male and female instead of man and woman. I'm not THAT old, so it's eerie to see such a thing pop up. It also happens with my red-neckin' thug relatives of any age. I dunno where it comes from, but it's not necessarily the same thing as falsely elevating your diction...
not that it makes it any less annoying...
Mysti