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I suppose this has come up before but I was ... etc. In purely etymological terms the "man" refers to "manager"

Sorry, but the ending "-man" refers to man, from the Old English mann, meaning man. Is someone going around saying it is an abbreviation of manager? That comes from the Latin manus, meaning hand.

Is that so? Hmm, I'll have to go back home and complain. I was assured by one of my (admittedly conservative anti-feminist) female teachers that it was an abbreviation for manager.
Thanks for putting me straight.
Chrissy
I don't like the gender-changing forms, nor do I like the gender-neutral forms. I'm SURE this has all been beaten ... for "man-hole cover", but neither does "person hole cover". Access hole cover or something like that will have to do.

I'm quite happy with "chair" and "access point/void space" + cover. Spokesperson could be speaker or representative.
Chrissy
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Too late. The Canadian national museum of anthropology and history ... was at the time acknowledged as one of several reasons.

Bloody stupidity. No other word for it. With the old name they could cover about 40,000 years going right back ... a Canadian museum would be falling over itself to show how the French peopled North America long before the indians.

But why can't paleolithic and other cultures pre-dating Civilization be "covered" in a Museum of Civilization? Aren't the origins of civilization an appropriate concern?

Michael West
Melbourne, Australia
I suppose this has come up before but I was ... etc. In purely etymological terms the "man" refers to "manager"

Sorry, but the ending "-man" refers to man, from the Old English mann, meaning man.

At this point it is obligatory to point out that Old English mann generally meant just "human being", unlike Modern English "man", which usually (though not invariably) means "male human being". I have now discharged this obligation.
Kevin Wald (Email Removed) > "Hwaet saegest thu, http://www.math.uchicago.edu/~wald > yrthlingc?" AELfric
Given two undesriable forms, the shorter (one syllable) would seem to be less offensive than the longer (two syllables), no?

Yes, that's exactly what I had in mind. Chairmin requires only a very slight pronunciation change from chairman, where chairperson is awkward to say and sounds odd to my ears. Other than that, it IS six of one and half a dozen of the other.
Regards,
John
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I suppose this has come up before but I was wondering what people here thought of the tendency to use ... with the title, and this in turn is an issue of wider significance. Perception can be reality in some cases.

It doesn't refer to "manager".
Though all managers are men, not all men are managers.

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
Sorry, but the ending "-man" refers to man, from the ... of manager? That comes from the Latin manus, meaning hand.

Is that so? Hmm, I'll have to go back home and complain. I was assured by one of my (admittedly conservative anti-feminist) female teachers that it was an abbreviation for manager.

It's an ideological problem, or, in AmE, one could say it was an agendad problem.
Both the pro- and anti-feminists are trying to muddy the etymological waters with ideology.

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
At this point it is obligatory to point out that Old English mann generally meant just "human being", unlike Modern English "man", which usually (though not invariably) means "male human being". I have now discharged this obligation.

And usually still does to people outside the USA and outside the academic disciplines of theology and the social sciences.

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
In purely etymological terms the "man" refers to "manager"

Sorry, but the ending "-man" refers to man, from the Old English mann, meaning man.

Actually, I think that Old English "mann" meant 'person'. The Old English word for 'man', "wer", was lost, and replaced with "man". (The same thing happened, I think, in French and Spanish: the Latin word for 'man', "vir", was lost and replaced with the Latin word for 'person', "homo", which became "homme" and "hombre".)
-Aaron J. Dinkin
Dr. Whom
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