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Ahhh, apologies for the top-post. Sometimes I forget. It comes from being in the Post-Sputnik Pre-Tonkin age group. I will do penance immediately.

J-
Sorry, but the ending "-man" refers to man, from the Old English mann, meaning man.

Actually, I think that Old English "mann" meant 'person'. The Old English word for 'man', "wer", was lost, ... word for 'man', "vir", was lost and replaced with the Latin word for 'person', "homo", which became "homme" and "hombre".)

Quite. So waht is needed is not to insist that the general word "man" always be sex-specific. If you want to avoid sexist language, use wermen and women.

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
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Though all managers are men, not all men are managers.

I've had as many as three women at a time in my management chain. (I currently have one, but as CEO she's arguably more an "executive" than a "manager".)

Uh huh.
That's three out of six and a half milliard. Quite a way to go.

Or are you implying that those women were not men, but goats, crabs or mosquitoes

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
Actually, I think that Old English "mann" meant 'person'. The Old English word for 'man', "wer", was lost, and replaced with "man".

Quite. So waht is needed is not to insist that the general word "man" always be sex-specific. If you want to avoid sexist language, use wermen and women.

This means, of course, that a werewolf must be male; to refer to a female lycanthrope, we must say "wifewolf".
-Aaron J. Dinkin
Dr. Whom
Actually, I think that Old English "mann" meant ... Latin word for 'person', "homo", which became "homme" and "hombre".)

Also happened in Italian ("uomo").

I've noted here before that uomo can occasionally be sex-neutral. I got into an odd discussion on a plane, about the morality of drinking alcohol, with a woman who at a certain point referred to herself as "io, come uomo".
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}>>Actually, I think that Old English "mann" meant 'person'. The Old }>>English word for 'man', "wer", was lost, and replaced with "man". }>
}> Quite. So waht is needed is not to insist that the general word "man" }> always be sex-specific. If you want to avoid sexist language, use wermen }> and women.
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} This means, of course, that a werewolf must be male; to refer to a female } lycanthrope, we must say "wifewolf".
Or "wowolf".

R. J. Valentine
But, but if "vice-chairman" carries no hint of "vice" to you, why should "vice chair" suddenly do so?

I often state that I am in charge of all vice in the organization. I suspect that the real answer ... me, a chair is a piece of furtniture, and a vice chair is a piece of furniture equipped with vices.

What about the throne?

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
I suppose this has come up before but I was ... etc. In purely etymological terms the "man" refers to "manager"

Sorry, but the ending "-man" refers to man, from the Old English mann, meaning man. Is someone going around saying ... the "man" question, including showing how the female experts on the panel had less tolerance for it than the males.

So what about "manning" the phones?
Is this the same derivation?
Interested
Chrissy
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'Person' seems fine to me too, so chairperson, spokesperson. Though, again there are objectors who prefer to make it clear ... USA ever puts a woman in the White House, I assume she'll be President or Vice-President. So why not chairperson?

I've sometimes (with deceiving diffidence) suggested to women who don't like apparently sexist words like chairman or spokesman whether they preferred woperson or wifeperson as the proper replacement for woman .
Sometimes it takes some explaining and a look at the etymology of woman in a dictionary to make my point.
On the other hand I totally understand where they are coming from. Man does mostly mean 'male human being' and woman is generally not perceived as a compound. (Some had the idea woman had something to do with womb !)
Changing a language to fit ideology is difficult.
Jim Allan
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