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the simple

I see that the woman's voice attached to Merriam-Webster's Collegiate ... the final word, as always, must come from Richard.

Neither you nor Richard should be considered expert in Midwestern (or even Western) pronunciation, Charles. Richard, it is true, seems ... in manor and manner in the same way (though I admit that Ray does some research to back it up).

We say them both the same in Boston too, but probably not the same way Chicagoans do
Must be that Toronto accent Emotion: smile I hear a minor but noticeable difference in both sets of words.
John Kane
Kingston ON
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Neither you nor Richard should be considered expert in Midwestern (or even Western) pronunciation, Charles. Richard, it is true, seems to have spent a few months in Chicago,

Almost exactly 16 months. But I also spent a good part of a few years in Michigan.
Ray Wise, a Midwesterner, born and bred, and I, (ditto), assert that we speak the ending syllables in manor and manner in the same way (though I admit that Ray does some research to back it up).

You and Ray are actually from different dialect regions, though. Ray is from Central Illinois, north of Egypt, and thus belongs to the Midland family; you are Northern or Inland North or something along those lines. Chicago people (like Erk and Murr) are Inland North.
I don't know how to pronounce 'manor'. Is it read the same as 'manner'?

Close to it, but not exactly. I don't do symbols. Richard?

I'm inclined to agree with you, Charles, but that would be only for careful speech. Normally, there's be no noticeable difference. Were I to say something like "... in a manor manner ..." to an audience, I'd surely make the two words sound a bit different from each other. Just a tiny bit, mind you. That falls more in the elocution field than in anything else.
Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
Close to it, but not exactly. I don't do symbols. Richard?

I'm inclined to agree with you, Charles, but that would be only forcareful speech. Normally, there's be no noticeable difference. ... a manor manner ..." to an audience, I'd surely make the two words sound a bit different from each other.

How would they know which was which?
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I'm inclined to agree with you, Charles, but that would ... the two words sound a bit different from each other.

How would they know which was which?

The "manor" one would show a trace of the "o". There is no "o" in "manner".

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
In our last episode,
,
the lovely and talented Skitt
broadcast on alt.usage.english:
How would they know which was which?

The "manor" one would show a trace of the "o". There is no "o" in "manner".

The placename of a small town near Austin, Texas, is pronounced MAY-nor. Evidently it is from a surname. but whether the present pronunciation owes to the pronunciation of the surname, I don't know.
appears to be the official site, .com being used by some smaller towns instead of .tx.us .

Lars Eighner (Email Removed) http://www.larseighner.com / Housework can't kill you, but why take a chance? Phyllis Diller
No, yes! Those are two other words, but they both end with the same "er" as manor and manner.

They do not, nor do 'manor' and 'manner' end with the same 'er' sound.

They do in BrE; so does 'manna'.

Rob Bannister
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I don't know for how long Ray lived in Central Illinois, or where he lived before he moved to the Minneapolis area (or how long he has lived in the latter area).
Except for 5 years in various places outside my present area, I have lived my life on the cusp of about 3 of those areas: Inland North, Midland North, etc.
But I don't claim expertise. My dialect/accent tends to be an overlap of the three areas but all soundly Midwestern.
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