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I first learned to speak Ohio English, then moved on to Connecticut English. So perhaps that explains it.
Before we kill this off let me try one more pair:
"Tutor" "Tooter".
Izzy
Yes. All five have a different sound to them. Do ... speak English; a person's dialect says something about the person.

I first learned to speak Ohio English, then moved on to Connecticut English. So perhaps that explains it. Before we kill this off let me try one more pair: "Tutor" "Tooter".Let me be the first to respond, since I didn't participate in your earlier exercise.

I pronounce them identically.
As a further comment to Areff's contribution: I am MIMIM.
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"Tutor" "Tooter".

Let me be the first to respond, since I didn't participate in your earlier exercise. I pronounce them identically.

And "Tudor"? (In standard BrE, "tutor", "Tudor" and "tooter" are quite distinct, as are "Mary", "merry" and "marry".)
Alan Jones
Let me be the first to respond, since I didn't participate in yourearlier exercise. I pronounce them identically.

And "Tudor"? (In standard BrE, "tutor", "Tudor" and "tooter" are quite distinct, as are "Mary", "merry" and "marry".)[/nq]TITIT would suit, for me. I am glad you mentioned it, since the clear enunciation of the second consonant in some dialects (I am thinking mainly of BrE) might accompany a differentiation in the "-or" from the "-er". For me, a single flap of the tongue handles the second consonant in all three words. (For Izzy and Charles: if I feel there is a need to remove all confusion as to which word I am saying, I will slow down, separate the syllables, and probably assign equal stress to both syllables.

In that event, I would pronounce each second consonant and second vowel differently in the case of "tutor" and "Tudor". In fact, to underline the associations I make with that clear enunciation, I would probably pronounce the "tu-" as "tew-" or "tyu-" or even "/tju-/".) Sounds like a cardinal, doesn't it?
And "Tudor"? (In standard BrE, "tutor", "Tudor" and "tooter" are quite distinct, as are "Mary", "merry" and "marry".)

TITIT would suit, for me. I am glad you mentioned it, since the clear enunciation of the second consonant in ... enunciation, I would probably pronounce the "tu-" as "tew-" or "tyu-" or even "/tju-/".) Sounds like a cardinal, doesn't it?

So, tomorrow, I'm going to marry merry Mary, the Tudor tooter tutor.

David
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earlier

And "Tudor"? (In standard BrE, "tutor", "Tudor" and "tooter" are quite distinct, as are "Mary", "merry" and "marry".)

TITIT would suit, for me. I am glad you mentioned it, since the clear enunciation of the second consonant in ... enunciation, I would probably pronounce the "tu-" as "tew-" or "tyu-" or even "/tju-/".) Sounds like a cardinal, doesn't it?

The simpler explanation of -er -or equivalence is likely to be found in the fact that most Brits long ago lost the "R" in standard speech. The Irish (and most Americans) never have. A linguist can expand, no doubt.
I first learned to speak Ohio English, then moved on ... this off let me try one more pair: "Tutor" "Tooter".

Let me be the first to respond, since I didn't participate in your earlier exercise. I pronounce them identically. As a further comment to Areff's contribution: I am MIMIM.

In which case all this pronunciation protestation you've been doing lately seems a bit odd. MIMIMs in Australia must get used to having to explain things twice. At least I do not imagine that you, unlike poor Wales, had a nanny with a problem with "patients". Probably, like Mr Durkin, you picked up the PIP syndrome in the USA. Or did you?

Where did you learn to make a comment "to" anythinbg?
TITIT would suit, for me. I am glad you mentioned ... "tyu-" or even "/tju-/".) Sounds like a cardinal, doesn't it?

So, tomorrow, I'm going to marry merry Mary, the Tudor tooter tutor.

At the risk of appearing terminally stubborn, I hear six different endings. "Tudor" and "tutor" are subtly different, perhaps merely because of the 'd' versus the 't'.
Izzy
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Let me be the first to respond, since I didn't ... As a further comment to Areff's contribution: I am MIMIM.

In which case all this pronunciation protestation you've been doing lately seems a bit odd. MIMIMs in Australia must get ... up the PIP syndrome in the USA. Or did you? Where did you learn to make a comment "to" anythinbg?

"Patients" "Patience"
For me the first ends in an "uh", the second in an "eh"/

Am I some kind of freak?
Izzy
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