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earlier TITIT would suit, for me. I am glad you ... "tyu-" or even "/tju-/".) Sounds like a cardinal, doesn't it?

The simpler explanation of -er -or equivalence is likely to be found in the fact that most Brits long ago lost the "R" in standard speech. The Irish (and most Americans) never have. A linguist can expand, no doubt.

Oh, Lord. I forgot all about the rhotics, er, whateverr. Thanks for the reminder.
Let me be the first to respond, since I didn't ... As a further comment to Areff's contribution: I am MIMIM.

In which case all this pronunciation protestation you've been doing lately seems a bit odd. MIMIMs in Australia must get ... up the PIP syndrome in the USA. Or did you? Where did you learn to make a comment "to" anythinbg?

Oh, gee, this thing is getting complicated, isn't it? I was the one who typed "comment to", I am afraid, when I should have said "comment on".

As to the PIP (Areff's acronym for "Pen is Pin"), I must say I am PinP, and can't speak to (Yes? Yes. "to") a transfer to "Patients is Patience". And Izzy started out with Ohio English and after that learned Connecticut English. I am a lifelong Wisconsin English speaker, whatever that means to anyone. (I think Areff has doubts about the Midwesternness of Ohio, but is definite about the Midwesternness of Connecticut English.)

It never occurred to me that the identical vowels in the second syllable might come out differently as Izzy says them. I was only looking at the "-ts" v "-ce"
I think I am finished with this thread. Despite my hinterlandishness, I am, like Charles, now all at sea.
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So, tomorrow, I'm going to marry merry Mary, the Tudor tooter tutor.

At the risk of appearing terminally stubborn, I hear six different endings. "Tudor" and "tutor" are subtly different, perhaps merely because of the 'd' versus the 't'.

That's not stubborn at all, they are different to me, which is why I posed it in that way except for Tudor/tutor which I think sound the same.

David
==
replace usenet with the
And "Tudor"? (In standard BrE, "tutor", "Tudor" and "tooter" are quite distinct, as are "Mary", "merry" and "marry".)

TITIT would suit, for me. I am glad you mentioned it, since theclear enunciation of the second consonant in some ... clear enunciation, I would probably pronounce the "tu-" as "tew-"or "tyu-" or even "/tju-/".) Sounds like a cardinal, doesn't it?

OK, Pat, let's have this out in the open. I make a big effort with "Packard", "Poughkeepsie", and "Potomac". Regardless of regional custom, it's just wrong to pronounce the "Tu" of "Tudor" the same way as the "too" of "tooter" in so far as it refers to British people, at least. Merrulund was not named after a woman called "Tooder". Proper names are not like other words.
(And I was born in Melb'n.)

Mike.
Is that a town is 'Stralia?
Izzy
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Proper names are not like other words. (And I was born in Melb'n.)

Is that a town is 'Stralia?

I'm pretty sure in formal usage that's "Stryl-ya", mate.

Cheers, Harvey
Canada for 30 years; S England since 1982.
(for e-mail, change harvey.news to harvey.van)
On 25 Jun 2005, Iskandar Baharuddin wrote

Is that a town is 'Stralia?

I'm pretty sure in formal usage that's "Stryl-ya", mate.

Sorry. I really did know better, but got a bit careless.

Izzy
On 25 Jun 2005, Iskandar Baharuddin wrote I'm pretty sure in formal usage that's "Stryl-ya", mate.

Sorry. I really did know better, but got a bit careless.

Geez, you NawShaw fancy-pants silvertails! Ut's "Stry-ya".

Mike.
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Sorry. I really did know better, but got a bit careless.

Geez, you NawShaw fancy-pants silvertails! Ut's "Stry-ya".

What say we just leave it at "Oz"?
Izzy
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