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Please tell me if my understanding is correct.

1. There is much water in the bottle. ― Unnatural

2. There is not much water in the bottle. ― OK

3. There is too much water in the bottle. ― OK


Then, what about "We have many problems."?

According to Longman Dictionary of Common Errors, "We are given many tests." does not sound right. It should be "We are given a lot of tests."

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SnappyIt should be "We are given a lot of tests."

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CJ

Comments  
SnappyThen, what about "We have many problems."?

That's different. "Problem" is countable. "We have many problems." is unexceptionable.

SnappyAccording to Longman Dictionary of Common Errors, "We are given many tests." does not sound right. It should be "We are given a lot of tests."

I can't wholeheartedly agree with Longman here. The difference between "many" and "a lot of" seems to me to be one of register, with "a lot of" being decidedly on the casual side. Also, consider that you can say "We are given many, many tests" but not "We are given a lot of, a lot of tests."

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 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.

According to Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English, "much" is mainly used in questions and negative sentences, or after too or so.
I found this on the Internet: Much rain has fallen this year.
Is this a natural expression?
Is it better to say, "A large amount of rain has fallen this year," or if it is an informal statement, "A lot of rain has fallen this year"?

SnappyAccording to Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English, "much" is mainly used in questions and negative sentences, or after too or so.

Right.

SnappyI found this on the Internet: Much rain has fallen this year.Is this a natural expression?

Yes, but it's more formal, for writing. It's not conversational.

SnappyIs it better to say, "A large amount of rain has fallen this year,"

No, but that's not wrong, just somewhat unnatural.

Snappyor if it is an informal statement, "A lot of rain has fallen this year"?

Yes, that's typical spoken English.

CJ

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