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Hi,

when talking about your marital status in the CV, is there any other answer besides single and married ? (someone might be in a relationship but not necessarily married ... how to name that person then?)

Thanks!

Mojca
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This will be a difficult question to answer, because in the U.S., you would NEVER, EVER put your marital status on a resume or CV. It's illegal for the company hiring you to ask about it at all, as it is to ask about children. So, if you are in a culture where doing this is the norm, you'll have to hear from someone else on this. Good luck.
Grammar GeekThis will be a difficult question to answer, because in the U.S., you would NEVER, EVER put your marital status on a resume or CV. It's illegal for the company hiring you to ask about it at all, as it is to ask about children. So, if you are in a culture where doing this is the norm, you'll have to hear from someone else on this. Good luck.
Very interesting ! Emotion: surprise

I didnt know that it is illegal in US.
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I guess most of the options would be covered by single, married, separated, divorced, widowed. There isn't really a word for 'living with someone'.

I too would avoid mentioning in most western countries. It is also illegal for employers in the UK to ask about your marital status/children etc. It is not illegal to put the information on your CV of course, but still best to avoid it. It is seen as irrelevant to your ability to do the job and the legislation came about to stop employers discriminating against women with children or those they believe may get pregnant (young married women).
MojcaHi,

when talking about your marital status in the CV, is there any other answer besides single and married ? (someone might be in a relationship but not necessarily married ... how to name that person then?)

Thanks!

Mojca

If you have to put your marital status in your CV, I think you should put one of two possibilities: married or single, but if you live togheter with other person and you aren't legally married, in this case of course you shouldn't put this, "I live togheter with other person." Because in front of the law you are single.

In my country if people live togheter after some years, in front of the law, they have( in some cases) the same rights they are legally marrie, but they don't use to say, "we are married".
The term for a couple that lives together but are not married is Common Law.
In Trinidad and Tobago a common Law wife or husband is now recognised as the legal spouse of the other person in the relationship.
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It is worth checking carefully as not all countries recognise this as a legal status. This gives a good survey of different legal terms for cohabitation:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common-law_marriage
Hi,
There are quite a number of such cultural differences in 'the west'.

eg we don't include a photo with our CV/resume.

eg we don't specify our date of birth or age

eg we don't specify our religion

Once we have a job, we don't ask our boss for special leave to get married, or to lend us money.

We don't write a joining letter, in the way that other posters here seem to.

Best wishes, Clive
The correct word to describe someone in a stable relationship, but not married is: cohabitant. This also implies living under the same roof.
Yours,
Robin
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