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Hi,

I have a question about "comprise". It is said "avoid using 'of' after any form of 'comprise' and substitute 'is composed of'". But I found this sentence in a supposed-to-be standard book. So I want to know how do you use the expression in your daily for the native speakers. Do you say "something is comprised of ..." ?Thanks a lot.

Ahava
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Hello Ahava

'To be comprised of' is commonly used by native speakers.

The assumption seems to be that it has the same structure as 'to consist of' or 'to be composed of'.

This isn't the case, however; the proper use would be:

'The market comprises several groups.'

MrP

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Hello MrP,

Thank you so much for your note.

You said, 'To be comprised of' is commonly used by native speakers. So this structure is acceptable, right?
As for the sentence I read in my book, you said, the proper use would be: 'The market comprises several groups.' Do you mean in formal writing, it should go like "to comprise" ?

Sorry for my clumsy. Emotion: embarrassed Looking forward to your note. Thanks a lot!Emotion: smile

Ahava
Hello Ahava

'To be comprised of' is commonly used, but incorrect, and so best avoided. No doubt it will one day be 'acceptable', but at the moment it can still raise eyebrows.

If you say (in conversation) 'the market is comprised of several groups', many fairly literate native speakers will think it's fine.

If you say 'the market consists of several groups', or 'the market comprises several groups', all fairly literate native speakers will think it's fine.

So it's better to use the second form!

MrP
Now I see. Thank you so much!Emotion: smile
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