I have been looking for a master list (a corpus) of all grammatical cases in English or the best approximation of it you know of such a list. Preferably with examples.
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I did find declension and of grammatical cases but the first was just what the title says and the second was not comprehensive and it included many langs. I just need them in English. .
Anything that is not semantic is grammatical and is normed by some rules. I am looking for these rules in English
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Any help?
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onetitfemme
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I have been looking for a master list (a corpus) of all grammatical cases in English or the best approximation of it you know of such a list. Preferably with examples.

English has nominative, possessive, and, for pronouns, object. That's all.
I have been looking for a master list (a corpus) of all grammatical cases in English or the best approximation ... that is not semantic is grammatical and is normed by some rules. I am looking for these rules in English

When you've got that, perhaps you could find an evening to devote to squaring the circle. Meanwhile, in ascending order of age:

Rodney Huddleston & Geoffrey K. Pullum, The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language , CUP, 2002
Randolph Quirk et al., A Comprehensive Grammar of the English Language , Longman, 1985
Otto Jespersen, A Modern English Grammar on Historical Principles (7 volumes), Carl Winter, 1909-1949

Mike.
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I have been looking for a master list (a corpus) ... it you know of such a list. Preferably with examples.

English has nominative, possessive, and, for pronouns, object. That's all.

Some (not I) would say that English has a dative case, as for instance "me" in "She gave me the book".
Alan Jones
When you've got that, perhaps you could find an evening to devote to squaring the circle. Meanwhile, in ascending order of age:(...booklist snipped...)

Thank you Mike for the book leads, which led me to some info about the existence of some "Survey of ... why is it so hard to find such a list. When I ask my colleagues they give you weird looks

Is it possible that you are using "case" in an unusual way? Or are you asking about Old English, also known as "Anglo-Saxon"? Modern English has very few remaining case-forms, all of them in pronouns, and all are listed in the first site you mentioned. If that short list doesn't contain all the information you need, perhaps you could give us a couple of examples of the kind of thing you are looking for. Then we could be more helpful.

Mike.
(...booklist snipped...)

Thank you Mike for the book leads, which led me ... When I ask my colleagues they give you weird looks

Is it possible that you are using "case" in an unusual way? Or are you asking about Old English, ... us a couple of examples of the kind of thing you are looking for. Then we could be more helpful.

I suspect she's asking about what the Chomskyans call "theta-roles," i.e. Cases in Fillmore's sense. Turns out there's an indefinitely large number of them, in every language.
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Is it possible that you are using "case" ... you are looking for. Then we could be more helpful.

I suspect she's asking about what the Chomskyans call "theta-roles," i.e. Cases in Fillmore's sense. Turns out there's an indefinitely large number of them, in every language.

I had wondered: but she seems to have expected her colleagues to know what she meant. In that case, if those colleagues are linguists, they would have; and if they aren't, the expectation would have been decidedly unreasonable. My nose is twitching, to coin a phrase.

Mike.
Is it possible that you are using "case" in an ... language/linguistic issues (google: "everyone and everybody. the same thing?"). .

We techies basically use the term "case" in the following way:
1. There 4/(5) singular forms (I, you, (she/he), it) and 3 pluralforms (We, you, they) in English

2. There regular and irregular verbs ...
2.1 regular verbs (with the exception of jinx ;-)) can be alsocategorized based on their ending in a voice or voiceless phoneme ...

3. There are substantives
4. Some of these substantives are used for nominal reasons (to namepeople)

5. there are "cases" or "rules" that then are used to build sentences" Juliette love(z) him (Romeo)" ...
...
I know there are great many "cases" that are not clear cut. For example, you coul dsay in English "They are following me", when you mean "someone" or "you may enter", when you mean "anyone" ... .
This is kind of what I am looking for
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I suspect she's asking about what the Chomskyans call "theta-roles," i.e. Cases in Fillmore's sense..

I don't know much about Chomsky's and Fillmore's work on these matters, but I do think these "case" to be finite many, could you point me to more info on the subject?
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and by the way I am a "he". I started using "onetitfemme" as my user id in amazon I had read there was a tribe on native Indian women that were warriors and would cut one of their *** to more easily carry their arrows (They meant business!). They used to habitat the "Amazon" river area in Brazil ...
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onetitfemme
2.1 regular verbs (with the exception of jinx ;-)) can be also categorized based on their ending in a voice or voiceless phoneme

How does not fall into one of these categories? Do you pronounce it differently from the rest of the English-speaking world?

Please ignore these questions if it's intended to be a joke, one that I'm obviously too dumb to get.
J.
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