+0

Hi,

I wonder whether the weather will weather the wether, or whether, etc. [+]

It is probably the best "litmus test" for those learning to pronounce the sound 'wh' correctly?

Unfortunately all my attemps to find (somewhere in the Internet) an audio/video recording with [+] have failed...

Any help (with finding [+]) would be appreciated!

+1

There are several videos on YouTube illustrating the difference between "w" and "wh" for those who pronounce these differently. For example, this.

However, many (I would say most) native speakers (including me) do not have a separate pronunciation for "wh", but instead pronounce it exactly the same as "w". This depends on region and also on personal variation. Unless you have some special requirement to emulate an English accent in which the difference is recognised, there is no need to try to learn a separate "wh" sound. You can just pronounce it the same as "w".

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Thank you for your reply, GPY!
1)

GPYFor example, this.

I guess you wanted to share some links with me?.... But I cannot see any in your posr... (Perhaps my Opera is acting up...)

2)

GPYUnless you have some special requirement to emulate an English accent in which the difference is recognised, there is no need to try to learn a separate "wh" sound.

You are right of course: I didn't mean to go that "far and deep" = and distinguish between the sounds [w] and [hw]. It was the standard [w] phoneme (as in RP) that I actually had in mind... sorry, it was not a very good idea to designate [w] as [wh] of course :-)

3) However, my main intention was to find out if somebody knows a link from which I could download an audio with this "hilarious" tongue-twister (= I wonder whether the wether ... the wether will kill).
....To all appearances nobody can help me with and so I will have to use an online speech synthesizer (as a workaround)

vlivefI guess you wanted to share some links with me?.... But I cannot see any in your posr... (Perhaps my Opera is acting up...)

No, it's not you, something has gone wrong and it doesn't show for me either in the finished post. It seems it is not really relevant to your needs, but the link should be to this:

TkzlKEpTvr0

In the US, "weather" and "whether" are pronounced the same: "wether." The "wh" in "whether" is pronounced the same as the "wh" in "why," "when," "while," and "where" - that is, the "h" is ignored and the "w" is pronounced as though it were there by itself.


However, in certain words the "wh" has a different sound. In "white" and "whale" the "wh" is pronounced as though the words were spelled "hwite" and "hwale. In "wh_re" the "wh" is pronounced as "h," "h_re."

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anonymousIn the US, "weather" and "whether" are pronounced the same: "wether." The "wh" in "whether" is pronounced the same as the "wh" in "why," "when," "while," and "where" - that is, the "h" is ignored and the "w" is pronounced as though it were there by itself. However, in certain words the "wh" has a different sound. In "white" and "whale" the "wh" is pronounced as though the words were spelled "hwite" and "hwale. In "wh_re" the "wh" is pronounced as "h," "h_re."

This seems improbable to me. If someone has a "w"/"wh" distinction in their accent, then I would expect it to be consistent across all "wh" words (apart from words where "wh" is prounced "h", obviously).

anonymousHowever, in certain words the "wh" has a different sound. In "white" and "whale" the "wh" is pronounced as though the words were spelled "hwite" and "hwale.

That appears to be a feature of some regional accents.

The "hw" sound is rare in the US, but it does occur. I notice it when I hear it, and I almost never do. It appears to be confined mainly to areas of the South.

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