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(>>But "thankyou" would be correct as a noun? Or an >>adjective?)
No, it is not correct. Not in any circumstances. It is always written "thank you".

No. Thankyou doesn't exist.

Thank you for your replies, but I am a little puzzled by them. According to the Chambers 21st Century Dictionary, "thankyou: 1. an utterance of 'thank you'. 2. an instance of thanking someone, or anything that expresses thanks or gratitude Also used as an adjective as in "a thasnkyou letter".
Also, the OED states (of "thank you"): B. n. (written with hyphen or as one word): An utterance of this phrase. Also, an unspoken expression of thanks.

It gives several examples of "thankyou" and "thank-you" and does not suggest that such a usage is sub-standard.
Re: The Mauritius Command - Patrick O'Brian Throughout the above ... what Decaen may have had in Mauritius before this reinforcement"

We still do this for place names which have lost an article in living memory. Consider (the) Ukraine.

Not to mention Lebanon.

** DAVE HATUNEN (Email Removed) ** * Tucson Arizona, out where the cacti grow * * My typos & mispellings are intentional copyright traps *
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And The Argentine

But I do not think that "Argentine" is ever said without the article is it, as in the other examples? In that case I believe that it would be just "Argentina" (although, indeed, we use the article in original Spanish: "la Argentina".)

But that's an artifact of Spanish, just as "la France" is an artifact of French.

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Re: The Mauritius Command - Patrick O'Brian

O'Brian is drearily boring.
And he steals his battle sequences from the true life adventures of Admiral Tommy Cochrane, the most amazing fighting sailor ever.
We still do this for place names which have lost an article in living memory. Consider (the) Ukraine.

And The Argentine, The Gambia, The Sudan.

The U.K. and The U.S.A.
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(>>But "thankyou" would be correct as a noun? Or an >>adjective?) "tony cooper" wrote

No, it is not correct. Not in any circumstances. It is always written "thank you".

No. Thankyou doesn't exist.

Thank you for your replies, but I am a little puzzled by them. According to the Chambers 21st Century Dictionary, ... of thanks. It gives several examples of "thankyou" and "thank-you" and does not suggest that such a usage is sub-standard.

Good point. I am prepared to make a Grand Pronouncement from this very Cathedra that the dictionaries are right. Further bull follows.

Mike.
And The Argentine, The Gambia, The Sudan.

The U.K. and The U.S.A.

The Commonwealth of Australia.
(We have wandered into The State of Déjà Vu.)

Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.english.usage)
And he steals his battle sequences from the true life adventures of Admiral Tommy Cochrane,

And your problem with that is what? Besides which, in 21 books I can only name two such battles. Can you name a third?

John Varela
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"Ray O'Hara" (Email Removed) wrote>
O'Brian is drearily boring. And he steals his battle sequences from the true life >adventures of Admiral Tommy Cochrane

My reading suggests that Patrick O'Brian has openly admitted that he has used certain episodes in Lord Cochrane's career as a basis for the Aubrey-Maturin adventures. However, if such "parallels" are to be adjudged as "theft" rather than "inspiration" then I would think that much of the world's literature might be seen to have a felonius provenance.
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