Re: The Mauritius Command - Patrick O'Brian
Throughout the above novel the name "Mauritius" is used both with and without the definite article. For example:
"to undertake the reduction of the
French possessions of the Ile Bourbon, otherwise Ile de la Reunion, otherwise Ile Buonaparte, and of the Mauritius, otherwise Ile de France,"

"Nor can I speak to
what Decaen may have had in Mauritius before this reinforcement"

In the majority of cases the article is not used, but on many occasions it is present, and I cannot see a pattern to formulate a regulation, nor can I discover it on Google.
I was thinking it may be an antique usage, perhaps a direct translation from the French "L'Ile Maurice" - "the Mauritius Island" ; but in the dialogues, both forms are used, and, to my non-native eye, it is most in the dialogues that O'Brian seems to preserve the 18th/19th century idiom.

Is there a rule that treats of this usage or is it a device of style that he has invented?
Thankyou
1 2 3
Re: The Mauritius Command - Patrick O'Brian Throughout the above novel the name "Mauritius" is used both with and without ... Mauritius*, otherwise Ile de France," "Nor can I speak to what Decaen may have had in Mauritius before this reinforcement"

We still do this for place names which have lost an article in living memory. Consider (the) Ukraine.
Thankyou

Please don't omit the space. It feels like fingernails on a chalkboard.

Peter Moylan, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. http://www.pmoylan.org For an e-mail address, see my web page.
Re: The Mauritius Command - Patrick O'Brian Throughout the above ... what Decaen may have had in Mauritius before this reinforcement"

We still do this for place names which have lost an article in living memory. Consider (the) Ukraine.

And The Argentine, The Gambia, The Sudan.

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
Web: http://hayesfam.bravehost.com/stevesig.htm
Blog: http://methodius.blogspot.com
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Thankyou

Please don't omit the space. It feels like fingernails on a >chalkboard.

Because it is a verbal usage, a truncated version of "I thank you"? My mistake. But "thankyou" would be correct as a noun? Or an adjective?
And The Argentine

But I do not think that "Argentine" is ever said without the article is it, as in the other examples? In that case I believe that it would be just "Argentina" (although, indeed, we use the article in original Spanish: "la Argentina".)
And The Argentine

But I do not think that "Argentine" is ever said without the article is it, as in the other examples? In that case I believe that it would be just "Argentina" (although, indeed, we use the article in original Spanish: "la Argentina".)

I don't think 'The Argentine" is currently used in English, but I'm sure it was used not all that long ago - that is, within my living memory, at least!
There are a surprising number of places that are or were referred to with 'the', although I think the modern tendency is for the 'the' to be dropped in almost all cases.

Cheryl
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
"Peter Moylan" wrote in message

Please don't omit the space. It feels like fingernails on a >chalkboard.

Because it is a verbal usage, a truncated version of "I thank you"? My mistake. But "thankyou" would be correct as a noun? Or an adjective?

Two separate words (a verb and a pronoun) in general, but the hyphenated form for modifying a noun:
Thank you.
Thank you very much.
Get well.
Get well soon.
a thank-you note
a get-well card

The three-martini lunch is the epitome of American efficiency. Where else can you get an earful, a bellyful and a snootful at the same time? (Gerald Ford, 1978)
"Peter Moylan" wrote in message

Please don't omit the space. It feels like fingernails on a >chalkboard.

Because it is a verbal usage, a truncated version of "I thank you"? My mistake. But "thankyou" would be correct as a noun? Or an adjective?

For the noun or adjective, I would write "thank-you". For example, "a thank-you note". This is consistent with the rule by which a multi-word phrase can be turned into an adjective by hyphenating it. Example: "the yellow-breasted kookaburra".
P.S. Actually, I have never heard of a kookaburra with a yellow breast. But it's late at night, and I couldn't think of a better example.

Peter Moylan, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. http://www.pmoylan.org For an e-mail address, see my web page.
"Peter Moylan" wrote in message

Please don't omit the space. It feels like fingernails on a >chalkboard.

Because it is a verbal usage, a truncated version of "I thank you"? My mistake. But "thankyou" would be correct as a noun? Or an adjective?

No, it is not correct. Not in any circumstances. It is always written "thank you".

Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Show more