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What does this sentence mean?

"Eating breakfast may be the end of teen obesity."

What is teen obesity, and what is the sentnece implying?

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What is teen obesity

Obesity among teenagers.

what is the sentnece implying?

Probably that if teenagers eat a proper breakfast then they won't be snacking so much on junk food through the day/morning, so they won't get so fat.

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Comments  
"Eating breakfast may be the end of teen obesity."

That isn't the best sentence ever. It reads like a headline written by a non-native. " "Teen obesity" is obesity among people in their teens, 13 to 19. Fat teenagers. The sentence seems to be trying to say something like "If teenagers get in the habit of eating breakfast, maybe there won't be any more fat ones."

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 GPY's reply was promoted to an answer.

Does it imply that eating breakfest will make people not obese, if so, why does it say "may", and not "can"?

"Eating breakfast may be the end of teen obesity."

May means it might happen, but there is no guarantee.

That is, if teens eat breakfast, there might be no more obese teenagers.

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Is it "may" because there are other causes to teen obesity? So, eating breakfast alone does not guarantee that it will end it as there are other causes. However, if the only cause was because people were not eating breakfast (which is not true at all), then it would be "can", right?

Does it imply that eating breakfast will may make people teenagers not obese

Yes.

if so, why does it say "may", and not "can"?

It is the author's choice which to use. "can" feels slightly more definite/confident than "may".

But in the video assessing the article itself, it says that eating breakfast causes people to be not obese, like it is guaranteeing it. Is there an issue with wording here?

https://www.khanacademy.org/math/probability/scatterplots-a1/creating-interpreting-scatterplots/v/correlation-and-causality

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But in the video assessing the article itself, it says that eating breakfast causes people to be not obese, like it is guaranteeing it. Is there an issue with wording here?

I am not clear whether "it says" is meant to refer to the article or to the video. In any case, "may" is not a guarantee, so if there is a statement elsewhere guaranteeing that eating breakfast will stop teenagers getting fat, then this would not be consistent with "may". However, it is common sense that there can be no such guarantee.

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