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Please, consider this. I'm trying to understand the level of irony I can put by using different verbs. Is what I have written in brackets correct?

May I ask if you at least can fry eggs? ("normal" irony)

May I ask if you at least know how to fry eggs? ("normal" irony)

May I ask if you al least have the particular skill to fry eggs? (Rude irony)

Can you fry eggs? (Without irony)

And thank you in advance!

Eladio
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Hi 'Eladio',

I'm trying to understand the level of irony I can put by using different verbs. Is what I have written in brackets correct?

May I ask if you at least can fry eggs? ("normal" irony)

May I ask if you at least know how to fry eggs? ("normal" irony)

May I ask if you al least have the particular skill to fry eggs? (Rude irony)

Can you fry eggs? (Without irony)

Irony is a tricky thing to identify and define. Much depends on your tone of voice, the words you give emphasis to, facial expression and other aspects of context. That's why it's a difficult thing to attempt via email. Even #4 could be said ironically, for example if I said it after you fry eggs for me and I have begun to eat them. I don't see anything particularly ironic about the words in #1 and #2. The only thing is that speaking rather formally about such a mundane topic might possibly suggest it is not a straightforward question. This formality is greater in #3.

(With 'can' and 'have', it sounds more natural to me if you put 'at least' after those words.)

Best wishes, Clive
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Eladio,

I don't think the verb choice in itself plays a significant role in creating irony (which you are using here in the sense of "sarcasm"). Rather, it is the entire sentence, and, as mentioned above, tone of voice. Unusual and clever expressions tend more toward sarcasm than mere changes in verbs. Sarcasm (or irony, as you say) can easily be combined with humor, of course.

Are you sure you've used a frying pan before?
And you claim to have passed "Egg Frying 101"!
It's hard to believe anyone could actually do that to an egg.

CJ