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In addition, we have always operated under the assumption that ninety-nine percent of beings strong int he Force belong to the Jedi Order, and they don't gamble. As regards the reamaining one percent - those who may have fallen between the cracks, as it were-well, most of them are probably off osmewhere doing good deeds or locked away in monasteries contemplating the mysteries of the universe.

As regards the reamaining one percent - those who may have fallen between the cracks is the person saying that those one percent are the ones who have fallen between the cracks, or is the person saying that those one percent might've (not certain) fallen between the cracks?

^ Sources are helpful

Also, what does "fallen between the cracks" mean?

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ninety-nine percent of beings strong in the Force belong to the Jedi Order

That accounts for 99% of the population with that criterion. (Strong in the Force)

As regards the remaining one percent - those who may have fallen between the cracks, as it were-well, most of them are probably off somewhere doing good deeds or locked away in monasteries contemplating the mysteries of the universe.

Those were the ones accounted for as being in the "Strong-in-the-Force" but not counted as in the Jedi Order. They were overlooked (slipped / fell through the cracks) for various reasons.

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/slip%20through%20the%20cracks

The expression comes from sweeping a floor made of wooden planks. Some of the dirt just falls through the cracks, so you cannot clean it up.

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Julian Ng-Thow-HingAlso, what does "fallen between the cracks" mean?

It is a bonehead mistake for "fallen through the cracks". I wish people would watch what they're saying. To fall through the cracks is to disappear, be lost, without anyone realizing it happened. I don't see how it applies here.

Julian Ng-Thow-HingAs regards the reamaining one percent - those who may have fallen between the cracks is the person saying that those one percent are the ones who have fallen between the cracks, or is the person saying that those one percent might've (not certain) fallen between the cracks?

What? Look up the word "may".

Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.

Is it: is the person saying that those one percent possibly have (not certain) fallen between the cracks?


So the person is saying every person in the 1% might've fallen between the cracks (to disappear).

Julian Ng-Thow-HingIs it: is the person saying that those one percent possibly have (not certain) fallen between the cracks?

Have you looked up "may" yet? If so, I don't understand the question.

Julian Ng-Thow-HingSo the person is saying every person in the 1% might've fallen between the cracks (to disappear).

The witer wrote nonsense. I am always reluctant to guess what a writer meant when he did not put it on the page, especially when the matter is fictitious to begin with, but I suppose that the few who did not become Jedis can be thought of as having somehow escaped the Jedi recruitment drive.

 AlpheccaStars's reply was promoted to an answer.
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Those were the ones accounted for as being in the "Strong-in-the-Force" but not counted as in the Jedi Order. They were overlooked (slipped / fell through the cracks) for various reasons.

DIdn't the speaker say "may", though? Not necessarily "slipped through the cracks"? Or is he saying that those %1 fell through the cracks? I'm kind of confused.


This is similar to this situation I guess.


A: "Are you going to the party?"

B: "Maybe if time permits."


Is he saying that if time permits, he MIGHT go, or he WILL go? Is this scenario the same as my example (in star wars)?

Julian Ng-Thow-HingDIdn't the speaker say "may", though? Not necessarily "slipped through the cracks"? Or is he saying that those %1 fell through the cracks? I'm kind of confused.

You are being far too literal. Human natural language is not like mathematics.
They slipped through the cracks / They may have slipped through the cracks

To me, these are about the same. The idiom is already imaginative and figurative language. The meaning does not change much with the modal verb. The modal verb suggests that as part of the story line they were being clever in escaping the count.

Flying a meter abov the ground, Palpatine's agile speeder skimmed over the plains below Theed plateau, leaving long curving trails in the tall grasses. The day was bright and clear, the warm air abuzz withi nsects and strewn pollen.

"Exhilarating,” Plagueis said.

”Maybe I’ll become a professional racer.” Palpatine said.

”The Naboo might expect more of the eldest son of House Palpatine.” Plagueis said.

in this case, “might” introduces a possibility, meaning Person B is not certain? I’m not sure if I’m being too literal. Could you tell me what you perceive it as?

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Julian Ng-Thow-Hingin this case, “might” introduces a possibility,

No, it is a different usage.

https://www.macmillandictionary.com/dictionary/american/might_1

See entry #3

Julian Ng-Thow-Hing”The Naboo might expect more of the eldest son of House Palpatine.” Plagueis said.

He is certain that being a racer is not the expected career choice for the heir.

I can suggest to you that the Naboo expect more of the eldest son of House Palpatine.” Plagueis said.