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Hi

I was doing an exercise on may and might. I have a few questions.

1. It may rain, you'd better take a coat. I was thinking about "might" in this sentence?

2. He said that it might rain. In contrast to the previous sentence, this time "may" changed into "might"?

3. He said that we might use his office whenever we liked. Hmmm, how about "may" in this sentence? Maybe it's because of the past tense, I guess.

4. He has refused, but he might change his mind if you asked him again. If the word "might" indicates that something is less probable, in contrast to "may" then I think I understand it.

The last two sentences:

1. Nobody knows how people first came to these islands. They.................... have sailed from South Africa on rafts. The answer key says: may or might. Would you prefer to choose may or might in such a sentence?

2. He isn't going to eat it; I ................ as well give it to the dog. The answer key says: may or might. My question is the same as above?

thanks
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1. It may rain, you'd better take a coat. I was thinking about "might" in this sentence?-- Might is OK too.

2. He said that it might rain. In contrast to the previous sentence, this time "may" changed into "might"?-- Yes

3. He said that we might use his office whenever we liked. Hmmm, how about "may" in this sentence? Maybe it's because of the past tense, I guess.-- Yes, natives prefer the past here, though may will work if you also change liked to like and the conditons are still true.

4. He has refused, but he might change his mind if you asked him again. If the word "might" indicates that something is less probable, in contrast to "may" then I think I understand it.-- Yes and no. It is less probable, but because it is 2nd conditional: He might if you asked vs He may if you ask.

The last two sentences:

1. Nobody knows how people first came to these islands. They.. have sailed from South Africa on rafts. The answer key says: may or might. Would you prefer to choose may or might in such a sentence?-- Either is fine for me.

2. He isn't going to eat it; I .. as well give it to the dog. The answer key says: may or might. My question is the same as above? - Either is fine for me. Some may say that might means marginally less probability than may, but I don't think it is really perceivable.
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OK, thanks Micawber Emotion: wink

So actually, may and might it's one and the same thing.

However when the sentence is written in the past tense it's much better to use "might" than "may".

On the other hand when the sentence is written in the present tense, it doesn't matter whether you use "may" or "might". Is that correct?
i i glad to read to it