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A: "Sue is very late."

B:"She may/might not have caught her train." (=It is possible that she didn't catch her train.)

Am I right in using "may/might not have done" here? Thank you for help!!
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Perfect!
Emotion: smile
CJ
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Anon. You remind me of my over meticulous high school teacher. She would try to seperate everything into different categories. Mostly, she was wrong. I am still (but nowadays I am recovering) under her effect.
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Thank you!!
You must use Might when you want to refer to the past and in this situation you can not use May.
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Anonymous You must use Might when you want to refer to the past and in this situation you can not use May.
Then the combination may not have caught can never be used? In your opinion, under what circumstances can it be used, if any? Can you give an example sentence with the proper use of may not have caught?
CJ
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CalifJimThen the combination may not have caught can never be used? In your opinion, under what circumstances can it be used, if any? Can you give an example sentence with the proper use of may not have caught?

I'm a native speaker, which doesn't mean I always get grammar right.

I was taught that you can say "Sally left home late so she may not have caught her train." (although "might not" would also be correct). In this situation we don't know whether or not she caught her train. You have to say "if Sally had left home late, she might not have caught her train." In this situation we know that she did not leave home late, and did in fact catch her train.

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https://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/en/english-grammar/may-might-may-have-and-might-have

anonymous
CalifJimThen the combination may not have caught can never be used? In your opinion, under what circumstances can it be used, if any? Can you give an example sentence with the proper use of may not have caught?

I'm a native speaker, which doesn't mean I always get grammar right.

I was taught that you can say "Sally left home late so she may not have caught her train." (although "might not" would also be correct). In this situation we don't know whether or not she caught her train. You have to say "if Sally had left home late, she might not have caught her train." In this situation we know that she did not leave home late, and did in fact catch her train.

All of that sounds completely reasonable to me. Emotion: smile

CJ