About giving no permission, may not / cannot are available as I learned in Basic English lesson.
Let me ask a question to further an understanding of their usages.
1) You may not use my car.
2) You cannot use my car.
When someone is said, "You cannot use my car," then he asks, "Why not?"
Answer would be: It's now in repair. or My father is using it now.
If this is "You may not use my car," then he asks, "Why not?" are those answers still valid? : It's now in repair. or My father is using it now.
"may not" must assume a reason involing the one said so, in my impression, like "because you're
a little drunk."
What do you think of it?
About giving no permission, may not / cannot are available as I learned in Basic English lesson.

Traditionally, "can" referred to ability and "may" to permission. Today it is common to use "can" to include both ability and permission, leaving "may" for possibility. You will not usually see the same person using "can" for permission and also using "may" for permission.
When someone is said, "You cannot use my car," then he asks, "Why not?" Answer would be: It's now in repair. or My father is using it now.

That is about ability, so "cannot" is correct.
If this is "You may not use my car," then he asks, "Why not?" are those answers still valid? : It's now in repair. or My father is using it now.

No, because that is about ability. The original statement would have to be "you cannot use my car."
"may not" must assume a reason involing the one said so, in my impression, like "because you're a little drunk."

That is about permission. Many people would use "cannot" here also, but "may not" is traditional.
What do you think of it?

I think "can" for permission is widely enough accepted that it should be considered standard.

Mark Brader, Toronto > "He is even more important than my cat, (Email Removed) > which is saying something." Flash Wilson

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About giving no permission, may not / cannot are available as I learned in Basic English lesson. Let me ask ... involing the one said so, in my impression, like "because you're a little drunk." What do you think of it?

I think "You may not use my car" could equally well mean "It is possible that you won't use my car", so I consider the whole distinction a bit pointless.

Rob Bannister
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About giving no permission, may not / cannot are available ... you're a little drunk." What do you think of it?

I think "You may not use my car" could equally well mean "It is possible that you won't use my car", so I consider the whole distinction a bit pointless.

Well, that should be "It is possible the you might not use my car", innit? Pedantically speaking, of course.

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
I think "You may not use my car" could equally ... car", so I consider the whole distinction a bit pointless.

Well, that should be "It is possible the you might not use my car", innit? Pedantically speaking, of course.

That seems vaguely tautological to me, since "it is possible" already covers the meaning of "might". Of course, in some circles might is always right.

Rob Bannister
Well, that should be "It is possible the you might not use my car", innit? Pedantically speaking, of course.

That seems vaguely tautological to me, since "it is possible" already covers the meaning of "might". Of course, in some circles might is always right.

Hmm, have you considered that it is also possible that you might use my car? The possibilities are there both ways.

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
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That seems vaguely tautological to me, since "it is possible" already covers the meaning of "might". Of course, in some circles might is always right.

Hmm, have you considered that it is also possible that you might use my car? The possibilities are there both ways.

I may use your car or I may not. It depends on how easy it is to break into and whether it's near the bank I'm about to rob.

Rob Bannister