Do you think 'me and my friends' is acceptable in a language learning aid meant for children of ten or eleven years?
Or should I opt for grammatical but stilted "my friends and I"? Thanks in anticipation for any advice
Regards
Kris
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Do you think 'me and my friends' is acceptable in a language learning aid meant for children of ten or eleven years? Or should I opt for grammatical but stilted "my friends and I"? Thanks in anticipation for any advice Regards Kris

Would you like to play with my friends and me?
My friends and I are going to the movies.
10 or 11? Sorry, my 6-1/2 year old 'gets' this."I" do things, "I" go places,
Things happen to "me", people talk to "me", people are nice to "me" (because I know not to correct their poor grammar, that's the teachers' job).
Note: there are two teachers, but they really have the same job.

JOE
Do you think 'me and my friends' is acceptable in a language learning aid meant for children of ten or eleven years? Or should I opt for grammatical but stilted "my friends and I"?

You seem not to have understood:
Personal pronoun I is the nominative case
i.e. is grammatically correct as the subject of a verb. Personal pronoun me is the accusative case
i.e. is grammatically correct for the object of a verb. The use of either where the other is required
is simply an error.
Neither is "grammatical but stilted." In some
sentences each is correct, in others not. The
missing element you need to provide for child
learners is probably whether their mother tongue
makes a distinction between nominative and
accusative case for personal pronouns.

Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
(Ottawa, Canada)
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Do you think 'me and my friends' is acceptable in ... and I"? Thanks in anticipation for any advice Regards Kris

Would you like to play with my friends and me? My friends and I are going to the movies. 10 ... correct their poor grammar, that's the teachers' job). Note: there are two teachers, but they really have the same job.

And it's quite wrong, I think, to call "my friends and I" "stilted". "My friends and me" is a very informal colloquial form, but that doesn't make the alternative stilted, the way "It is I" usually is.

Mike.
Do you think 'me and my friends' is acceptable in a language learning aid meant for children of ten or eleven years?

You're thinking of having an aid that will teach them bad grammar?

I would call it a handicap.
Chidren are not too stupid to learn good English.
Or should I opt for grammatical but stilted "my friends and I"? Thanks in anticipation for any advice Regards Kris

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Do you think 'me and my friends' is acceptable in a language learning aid meant for children of ten or eleven years? Or should I opt for grammatical but stilted "my friends and I"? Thanks in anticipation for any advice Regards

You, as a teacher, must teach the correct way, especially to children. Soon enough they will pick up the mannerisms of the region and society types that they wish to conform to.
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Do you think 'me and my friends' is acceptable in a language learning aid meant for children of ten or eleven years? Or should I opt for grammatical but stilted "my friends and I"? Thanks in anticipation for any advice Regards Kris

There are two questions here: grammar and politeness.

A sentence such as "I and my friends live in the city" violates a rule of politeness: It should be "My friends and I live in the city." Putting "I" first sounds egotistical.
In a sentence such as "Me and my friends live in the city," the most important rule which is being violated is a grammatical one. To be precise, that sentence violates a rule of grammar in standard dialects. In some nonstandard dialects, "Me and my friends live in the city" would be unquestionably grammatical.

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com
There are two questions here: grammar and politeness. A sentence such as "I and my friends live in the city" ... grammar in standard dialects. In some nonstandard dialects, "Me and my friends live in the city" would be unquestionably grammatical.

Indubitably. But it brings us up hard against the underlying political nature of these discussions. As I've said before and I admit I lack the time, funding, and inclination to back it up with proper research we English-speakers are heirs to a rather rare democratic tradition which for many of us colours our views on everything from language to ecology. Our tendency to say "To say 'wrong' is wrong" runs quite deep, and must seem arbitrary, and even perverse, from other viewpoints viewpoints which can seem arbitrary and perverse to me (and that was another example!).

Mike.
In some nonstandard dialects, "Me and my friends live in the city" would be unquestionably grammatical. Raymond S. Wise Minneapolis, Minnesota USA E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com

Not to put words in your mouth, are you suggesting that this is not just a case of poor grammar, but an accepted 'dialect'? In which case 'me' takes on the characteristic of a subject in certain dialects?
Judy Blume, in one of her 'Fudge' books, used that structure (me and my friends) and when I was reading the book to my child, I caught it and read it as 'My friends and I'. When she's old enough to read Mark Twain, I'll let her figure out the dialects involved, but for now, I'd like my children book authors to adhere to the rules of english from my younger days.
JOE
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