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Hi,

1. A mongoose is eaten up from nose to tail with curiosity.

What is meaning of this sentence?

Thanks.
Comments  
Hi,

A mongoose is eaten up from nose to tail with curiosity.

A mongoose is very, very curious (about something).

Another common word for 'eaten up' is 'consumed'. We often say that strong feelings, for example love or hate, 'consume' us.

This sentence is OK, but it seems just a little awkward.

Best wishes, Clive
CliveThis sentence is OK, but it seems just a little awkward.
Er...it's Rudyard Kipling. The whole sentence reads: It is the hardest thing in the world to frighten a mongoose, because he is eaten up from nose to tail with curiosity. [From Rikki-Tikki-Tavi in The Jungle Book.]
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Hi,

Well, a little more context does help.

However, in general, don't forget that writers from earlier generations sometimes write in a way that is not typical of modern English.

Best wishes, Clive
I agree.

...because he is eaten up with curiosity from nose to tail reads a little better - but who are we to argue with a Nobel Prize winner? In reading the story one would not necessarily notice, but in isolation it stands out a bit.
I prefer the original – the word order keeps you curious.

Mongooses have long tails; some species have long noses too. They are very active and busy, in their quest for food. It seems quite a good description to me.

MrP
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Hello (Mr. P),

You are absolutely correct. This sentence is from Rikki-Tikki-Tavi.

But what is meaning of He is eaten up from nose to tail with curiosity.

I am still confused.

Please help me.

Thanks.
Hi,

I didn't realize you were still confused about it. It's just a stylish, colourful way of saying the mongoose is full of curiousity, it has a very curious mind.

Clive
it means he wants to know what happened to him and where is he
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