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Please explain the meaning of underlined one?

Three children were born from the wed lock and are at present living with their father. Out of them two are males, their respective years of birth being 1973 and 1980 and the third is a female born in the year 1976. On 28-8- 1985 a petition under section 13-B of Hindu Marriage Act, 1955 (hereafter referred to as the Act’) seeking divorce by mutual consent was received by the court of the Additional District Judge, Amritsar purported to have been failed jointly by the two spouses.

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Comments  
The lexical meaning of "being" here is "is/are."
Their respective years of birth are 1973 and 1980.

This form is often used formally in appositives and parenthetical phrases. You won't find it in casual conversation, except by language freaks. I'm not really sure what it's called.

How does one person fail another? I was counting on you, and you failed me.
Passive voice: I was failed by all my so-called friends.
I seem to have been failed by all my so-called friends. (Passive voice, present perfect tense)

Edit. I think I'm wrong on my analysis. This is probably a perfect infinitive.
Still, it feels to me like a finite usage of "to fail." (HELP!)

Amritsar claimed to be failed by two women. The main verb is simple past: claimed/purported.

I guess "to be failed" is simply an infinitive phrase, direct object of the main verb.
"To have been failed" would be a perfect infinitive phrase.
I'm just not happy calling "failed" an adjective.
This is my analytical of the passage. Apparently, this is a legal document which I am not qualified to interprpet. However, from an English grammar standpoint, I have two cents' worth to share.

This long sentence has a few flaws in it. The subjects are the three children, but the sentence ended with " their father". The next line begun with, " Out of them " which is ambiguous. Is the father part of "them " ? If the text were " out of the three", then it would eliminate the ambiguity. Also, there should be a "comma" before "two are males".
vijay1010Out of them two are males, their respective years of birth being 1973 and 1980 and the third is a female born in the year 1976.
The bold italic is not a complete sentence because "being " is a non-finite verb, being used as a particple describing the two males. The green italic is fine as it is a complete sentence, with the verb "is" qualifiying the subject " a female " modified by the adverbial phrase (or some called adjective) " born in year 1976 ".

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vijay1010Out of them two are males, their respective years of birth being 1973 and 1980
Two of them are males. The birth year of one male is 1973; the birth year of the other male is 1980.
vijay1010On 28-8- 1985 a petition under section 13-B of Hindu Marriage Act, 1955 (hereafter referred to as the Act’) seeking divorce by mutual consent was received by the court of the Additional District Judge, Amritsar, (which is) purported to have been filed failed jointly by the two spouses.
In short, the petition is purported to have been filed by both spouses. That is, both spouses, acting together, petitioned the court -- at least that's what seems to be true.

Certain passives (is/was believed, is/was reported, is/was purported, is/was known, ...) take the perfect infinitive to show that what is believed, reported, etc. took place in the past:

The accident is reported to have taken place near 225 Elm Street.
The emergency room was said to have been closed at midnight.
This new author is believed to have written a masterpiece.

CJ
CalifJimThe emergency room was said to have been closed at midnight.
Hi, Jim,
Could you relate this to a non-infinitive structure, such as:

The emergency room has been closed at midnight for as long as I can remember.

Does the infinitive structure have the same ambiguity as my sentence, vis a vis "to be" plus adjective vs. passive voice?

I know we've had several threads in the past about "closed" as an adjective vs. a verb, but does that apply to the infinitive as well? is filed/failed an adjective or a verb?

- A.
I think that's hillarious, by the way. "Failed" is a typo. Emotion: headbang

On 28-8-1985 a petion was received by the court, purported to have been filed jointly by the two spouses.

Fine.

"the court of the Additional District Judge, Amristar purported"

How about a comma after "Amristar"?? I suppose he's the judge.

I read, "Amristar purported to have been failed." Sorry!
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On 28-8-1985 a petion was received by the court, purported to have been filed jointly by the two spouses.

By the way, is the underlined a participial phrase which happens to include an infinitive phrase?

I hope the poor horse will forgive me when we meet in the great beyond.
AvangiDoes the infinitive structure have the same ambiguity as my sentence
Yes, and I would have used a different sentence had I noticed the ambiguity! (My intention was to use closed non-adjectivally.)
AvangiI know we've had several threads in the past about "closed" as an adjective vs. a verb, but does that apply to the infinitive as well?
I'm not sure what you're getting at here. The word "closed" is the culprit (or any past participle similarly subject to this kind of ambiguity), not the infinitive structure.
Avangiis filed/failed an adjective or a verb?
In purported to have been filed, filed is a verb in my judgment. Note that a typical adjective should be able to take very: very interested, but not *very filed.

CJ
Avangiis the underlined a participial phrase which happens to include an infinitive phrase?
That sounds reasonable to me.

Emotion: smile
CJ
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