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Hello,

In the following sentence, is the verb "brings" positive or negative?

In other words, the meaning of the sentence "brings not only promise" is which one?

1. the availability of information that is brought to us by technological advances, doesn't bring promise.

2. the availability of information that is brought to us by technological advances, brings promise.


"The exponential growth in the availability of information brought to us by
technological advances brings not only promise, but for many a sense of information
overload and frustrations linked to a lack of confidence in using digital tools"


I will appreciate your help.

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You are not parsing this sentence correctly. The subject of the verb 'brings' is 'the exponential growth'. The verb 'brings' has multiple objects, ie promise and a sense of information overload and frustrations'. Think of the sentence this way.

"The exponential growth ( in the availability of information brought to us by
technological advances ) brings not only promise, but for many a sense of information
overload and frustrations linked to a lack of confidence in using digital tools."


Consider these simpler examples of not only . . . but. (The fuller version is 'not only . . . but also . . .)

Tom bought not only a bicycle but a car. This means that he bought both. the structure 'not only . . . but. . . makes the fact hat he also bought a car seem like a surprise to the reader.

Bob brought not only food but wine to my party. He brought both.

Mary loves not only Jim but Harry. She loves them both.


Now consider the basic idea of your sentence.

The growth brings not only promise but (1) a sense of information overload (2) frustrations.

>>> It brings both. <<<

Clive

Comments  

Generally speaking, the verb "to bring" is used in a positive way.

"Mary asked her brother to bring her the cup of coffee."

"Mary asked her brother to bring a bottle of wine to the party."

The reason for this is that the subject is asking another person to do something for him/her: To carry an object from a more distant point to the subject.

John asked Mary to bring him an apple from the store.

John asked Mary to bring him ideas for his speech.

In the sentence you are wondering about - the writer of the sentence is using the positive nature of the verb 'to bring' to make a specific point that something positive, like 'bringing' technology to mankind, can also be negative.

Mary brought Tom an apple from the store. She also brought him her bad cold.

Do you understand what I mean?

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 Clive's reply was promoted to an answer.

I appreciate your help.

As you said in the following sentence:

"The growth brings not only promise but (1) a sense of information overload (2) frustrations.

The growth brings both."

But, as you know, the word "promise" in the sentence is a noun and its meaning (in Longman dictionary), is "signs that something or someone will be good or successful".

So, the meaning of the word "promise" is positive.

But, the second part in the sentence (a sense of information overload) has a negative meaning.

Now, my question is, how the growth brings both positive and negative meaning in the sentence?

The growth brings not only promise but (1) a sense of information overload (2) frustrations.

The growth brings a good thing and two bad things.

The growth brings not only a good thing but (surprisingly) 2 bad things.

Clive

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Your help is greatly appreciated.