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I and a friend of mine had a lil argument about my nickname. He is convinced that my nickname no way can be used in the meaning of "teacher" or "tutor" because of the definite article. Since there's no modifier such as Maths or Biology or..whatever.. he thinks that "The Mistress" alone can have other meanings (owner, lover etc) but not "teacher". Is it really true? I chose this nickname just to state that I'm a female, coz "tutor" or "teacher" sound vaguely. I know that "mistress" now is out of use and archaic, but still how come it can't be used in the meaning of "teacher"?
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The phrase needs some context.

If you walk into a room and simply say 'I'm The Mistress', people will not know what you mean.

Clive
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AnonymousHe is convinced that my nickname no way can be used in the meaning of "teacher" or "tutor" because of the definite article

He's right, in my opinion. The first connotation that comes to mind is the lover of a married man who he supports, but is not married to.


If you want a nickname unequivocally associated with a tutor, then use "Schoolmistress."

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The argument is not about The first connotation that comes to mind. The question is whether "mistress" can mean "woman teacher" or not.
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AnonymousThe argument is not about The first connotation that comes to mind. The question is whether "mistress" can mean "woman teacher" or not.

I know that "mistress" now is out of use and archaic..
The word itself isn't out of use and archaic, but your intended meaning is.
It can mean "woman teacher" but only in the context of a much older English. Here is some etymology:

"female teacher, governess," from Old French maistresse "mistress (lover); housekeeper; governess, female teacher" (Modern French maîtresse, feminine of maistre "master") Early 14th century.

Sense of "a woman who employs others or has authority over servants" is from early 15th century. You will find this usage in old novels when the upper class had house servants.

Sense of "kept woman of a married man" is from early 15th century. (Without context, this is the definition that most present-day native speakers would think of.)