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I found the following sentence on a Youtube video. Though I can understand the meaning of the sentence without difficulty, I cannot understand the associated grammar. Therefore, I would really appreciate it if someone could let me know what is the meaning of "exposed to air" in the following sentence. Is it something related to second conditionals?


The filament inside a light bulb could glow for a long period because it contained within a vacuum. Exposed to air and it simply burn out in seconds.


Reference video with time:-

https://youtu.be/rKPv8zApee0?list=WL&t=1402

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He says "Expose it to air, and it would simply burn out in seconds."

Does that make more sense?

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dileepa Expose it to air and it simply burn out in seconds.

Combustion , or burning, is an exothermic chemical reaction that releases heat. But a source of oxygen is required for the reaction to proceed. In a vacuum, there is no oxygen, so the filament cannot catch fire and burn.

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Thank you very much for the answer.

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Thank you very much for the answer. In fact, I could understand the meaning of that sentence thinking about the context. What I cannot understand is the grammar rules associated with it. Is it feasible to replace the sentence with a conditional one like the following.


If it exposed to air and it simply burn out in seconds.


What I cannot understand is if it was a second conditional one, the result clause should have a model verb such as "would" or "might". That's why I cannot understand the grammar related to that sentence.

dileepa Is it feasible to replace the sentence with a conditional one like the following.
If it exposed to air and it simply burn out in seconds.

No, that sentence is not correct English.

dileepaWhat I cannot understand is if it was a second conditional one, the result clause should have a model verb such as "would" or "might".

The original sentence does contain the word "would":

Expose it to air, and it would simply burn out in seconds.

It is a kind of abbreviated way of saying "If you/one expose(d) it to air, (then) it would ...". As written, I suppose you could think of it as a hybrid between first and second conditional, although not in the usual textbook form. You will find that many native speakers do not form conditional sentences only according to the textbook rules that you may have learnt.

Thank you very much for the answer.

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