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When I was writing an essay about parents providing their children with an excessive number of toys, I wrote the following sentence. The main reason that I didn't used trend here was that I've already used that in the above of the essay. Therefore, I would really appreciate it if someone could let me know whether it is feasible to use the word - practice - to indicate the trend that parent purchasing more than necessary playthings for their offspring.


To begin with, there are some benefits of this practice.

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dileepathere are some benefits to this practice

This is OK as amended, though "practice" means "behaviour" or "way of doing something". It does not specifically mean "trend". I guess you probably already know this.

Does "To begin with" mean that there are initially benefits, but these diminish over time? (I did wonder whether you could perhaps be using it to indicate that this is your first point.)

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dileepaI didn't used use

After auxiliary do (do, does, did) you must use the plain form of the verb.

CJ

Thank you very much for the comment.

Thank you very much for the answer. In actual fact, I'm not precisely sure about the usage of "to begin with" in the above sentence. What I did was just write the introduction saying that there are both merits and demerits associated with the that practice mentioned in the question. Plus, I introduced my first point by using "to begin with" to connect the sentence.

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dileepaPlus, I introduced my first point by using "to begin with" to connect the sentence.

This is potentially ambiguous and could be read as meaning that the benefits diminish over time.

Thank you very much for the answer.