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The trouble is that AV programs all provide real time protection and when they talk about disabling the email scanning feature they are talking about disabling real time protection.

Disabling email scanning disables just one type of real time protection. Other types of real time protection will remain enabled.
AV program check for viruses at some or all of the following times: before downloading an email, while other software ... are real time. One can't check for a virus tomorrow that one executes today (even though Blimpy might suggest it.)

The less visible types of protection involve scanning newly created or modified files - in real time.
The interface to Norton Antivirus distinguishes three categories of real time protection which can be separately enabled: Autoprotect (as previous paragraph), Email (in and/or out), Scripts (Visual Basic, Javascript, etc).

The non-real-time activities are manually triggered or scheduled system scans.

Peter Duncanson
UK (posting from a.e.u)
In computing settings, "real time" always refers to data transactions initiated and completed as part of one operation. ...

Um, no, not exactly. It refers to operations that must be completed within a short time limit, before events external ... computer displaying streaming video must input, process, and display the frames as fast as they are transmitted. That's real-time computing.

As I learned it, there is a distinction between "soft" real-time, where a failure to meet the real-time criterion leads to below-spec performance, and "hard" real-time, where such a failure renders the application useless.
Your examples are of the latter category (later posters who question the streaming video example underestimate the processing power necessary to convert compressed video into display data - streaming video was not, in fact, practical until high-speed processors became widely available, quite recently). Fran's example would fall into the soft real-time class.
As a further example of soft real-time, consider the animation of virtual buttons on your screen. When you "press" such a button with the mouse, the button changes to have a depressed appearance. When you release the mouse button, it reverts to its normal appearance. What is the real-time criterion here? Well, plainly the change in appearance must occur instantly. But what is "instantly" as far as human perception is concerned? Is a 100 mS delay acceptable, or should we aim at something faster? And suppose that we can only achieve the effect after a noticeable 500 mS? Does this make the software useless, or simply irritating?

Mark Barratt
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http://www.geocities.com/nyelvmark
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Real time for Dr Who would of course be something ... as an old-fashioned police box and why no-one notices it.

Ah. Just me then? I mean, already knowing that stuff and assuming that it was put in for new viewers?

It wasn't the explanation that I found so entertaining, it was the way in which the particular lines - which I can't now remember - were delivered, as well as the way the camera dwelt on the whizzy civic landscape, especially the water feature which of course resembles a natural feature but isn't one and is equally out of place in its surroundings. Or perhaps I'm reading too much into it...

Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
Um, no, not exactly. It refers to operations that must ... frames as fast as they are transmitted. That's real-time computing.

A late and very tall friend of mine who specialised in building very large robots liked to illustrate how large robots had more time to calculate how to recover their balance than small ones by falling over very slowly on conference platforms.

Strange. I thought the Scotch had hollow legs which they felt compelled to keep filled with Scotch. The centre of gravity thus implied would seem to preclude very slow falling over since great human height (and the Scotch closely resemble humans) is achieved by abnormality of leg development. Of course the Caledonian swelled head is only a metaphorical condition and need not be taken into the calculation.
A late and very tall friend of mine who specialised ... small ones by falling over very slowly on conference platforms.

Strange. I thought the Scotch had hollow legs which they felt compelled to keep filled with Scotch. The centre of ... development. Of course the Caledonian swelled head is only a metaphorical condition and need not be taken into the calculation.

Even accepting for the same of argument all your assumptions in the above, your understanding of how they would affect the centre of gravity, and the behaviour of inverted pendulums, is still seriously adrift.

Chris Malcolm (Email Removed) +44 (0)131 651 3445 DoD #205 IPAB, Informatics, JCMB, King's Buildings, Edinburgh, EH9 3JZ, UK (http://www.dai.ed.ac.uk/homes/cam/)
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A late and very tall friend of mine who specialised ... small ones by falling over very slowly on conference platforms.

Strange. I thought the Scotch had hollow legs which they felt compelled to keep filled with Scotch. The centre of ... development. Of course the Caledonian swelled head is only a metaphorical condition and need not be taken into the calculation.

I thought calling the Scots Scoth had been scotched lang agae...
Jim
"a single species has come to dominate ...
reproducing at bacterial levels, almost as an
infectious plague envelops its host"
In computing settings, "real time" always refers to data transactions initiated and completed as part of one operation. ...

Um, no, not exactly. It refers to operations that must be completed within a short time limit, before events external to the computer render them useless.

Quibble with the "short". "Real-time" to me means that the correctness of the action depends at least in part on its meeting a temporal constraint specified by wall-clock time rather than internal or external events. Constraints can be "soft", in which case the program is "worse" if it doesn't meet them (and degrades by how much it misses) or "hard", in which case the program is simply "wrong" if it doesn't meet them.
For example, a computer that's steering a vehicle must determine which way to steer at a particular point before that ... computer displaying streaming video must input, process, and display the frames as fast as they are transmitted. That's real-time computing.

Actually a computer displaying streaming video has to display the frames at the rate they are supposed to be displayed even if it is ready earlier. Temporal constraints can go both ways.

In most systems the constraints will be short and on the level of human perceptual speeds (e.g., tens of milliseconds), with the goal being "in time to take action to correct a problem" or "before a person is able to notice a delay", but they can be quite long (minutes, hours, days, or longer) or very very short.

Evan Kirshenbaum + HP Laboratories >I like giving talks to industry,
1501 Page Mill Road, 1U, MS 1141 >because one of the things that I'vePalo Alto, CA 94304 >found is that you really can't
Ah. Just me then? I mean, already knowing that stuff and assuming that it was put in for new viewers?

It wasn't the explanation that I found so entertaining, it was the way in which the particular lines - which ... but isn't one and is equally out of place in its surroundings. Or perhaps I'm reading too much into it...

One of the reasons behind it is that the lead writer is from Cardiff and the series was shot mainly in South Wales. So they wanted to feature Cardiff strongly in at least one of the episodes.

David
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Strange. I thought the Scotch had hollow legs which they ... metaphorical condition and need not be taken into the calculation.

Even accepting for the same of argument all your assumptions in the above, your understanding of how they would affect the centre of gravity, and the behaviour of inverted pendulums, is still seriously adrift.

That "same" has not been used to deny authorship I am sure (I once had a "dictated but not read" like that) but inverted pendulums must be Scotch inventulums for use at conventulums on roboticums. In other words, "Eh?"
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