1 2 3 4
I think it's generally best to ignore it as a piece of meaningless advertising language: they seem to mean only what broadcasters mean by "live" you see or hear it at the time when it happens.

I rather admire the ability to claim that a term is meaningless and to suggest the meaning of the same term both in one sentence.
Two good posts, snipped.
Now, this is the definition in computing, but perhaps this is legitimate to use it differently in the general language. Make sure though that you don't make the mistake next time you are hacking the anti braking system of your car;)

I'm the only anti-braking system of my car. Most of the time

s/ meirman
Posting from alt.english.usage

If you are emailing me please
say if you are posting the same response.
Town NW of Pittsburgh Pa. 0 to 10 years
Indianapolis 7 years
Chicago 6 years
Brooklyn NY 12 years
now in Baltimore 22 years
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Two good posts, snipped.

Now, this is the definition in computing, but perhaps this ... you are hacking the anti braking system of your car;)

I'm the only anti-braking system of my car. Most of the time

That's rather wise;)
My next car will have only belts and pulleys, no
fancy electronics that go berserk for no reasons;)

And you can't even find somebody to repair it. Just change the computer, or upgrade the OS!
Mark Barratt turpitued:
As I learned it, there is a distinction between "soft" real-time, where a failure to meet the real-time criterion leads to below-spec performance, and "hard" real-time, where such a failure renders the application useless.

As a further example of soft real-time, consider the animation of virtual buttons on your screen. When you "press" such ... we can only achieve the effect after a noticeable 500 mS? Does this make the software useless, or simply irritating?

And, as a further example of hard real-time, consider a chemical process controller which must sample the process state once every
30 minutes, and then compute and apply appropriate control inputsbefore the next sample is due. You can beat the deadline by sitting there and doing the calculations on an abacus, and possibly even get a controller to work on Windows XP with the virus scanner disabled. Nevertheless, it's a hard real-time problem, because you're not allowed to miss the deadline.
When teaching about real-time systems, which I did for a few years, you have to spend the first hour or so beating the students about the head with a stick until they understand that "real-time" does not mean the same as "fast". It's an annoyingly common misconception.

Peter Moylan peter at ee dot newcastle dot edu dot au http://eepjm.newcastle.edu.au (OS/2 and eCS information and software)
Chris Malcolm turpitued:
A late and very tall friend of mine who specialised in building very large robots liked to illustrate how large robots had more time to calculate how to recover their balance than small ones by falling over very slowly on conference platforms.

By coincidence, I'm now supervising a group of students whose job it is to get a humanoid robot to walk through a maze, and of course the hardest part of that job is to get it to walk without falling over. The students made the - to me, surprising - discovery that the robot is easier to control if you raise its centre of gravity.

There's another group trying to get robot dogs to play soccer. With four legs, falling over is less of an issue so you can concentrate more on strategy.

Peter Moylan peter at ee dot newcastle dot edu dot au http://eepjm.newcastle.edu.au (OS/2 and eCS information and software)
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
I see the phrase or word-pair "real time" a lot. ... it did, say, 10-15 years ago? Thank you.. Lee Carkenord

The dictionary used by the Infoplease.com Web site is the *Random House Unabridged Dictionary,* Copyright 1997, that is, eight years ... given in that dictionary: From http://www.infoplease.com/ipd/A0617690.html "*2.* the actual time during which a process takes place or an event occurs."

If it hasn't been mentioned already in this this thread, I assume that's the sense in which computer games are described as being "real time". RTS seems to stand for "real time strategy". I think that means that events (battles or whatever) happen in the game at the speed that they would happen in real life and that players have to control things on the hoof rather than in turns.
But I don't operate in real time these days - only slow motion - so others will know more.

Phil C.