I see the phrase or word-pair "real time" a lot.
What does it mean?
Does it mean the same today as it did, say, 10-15 years ago?

Thank you.. Lee Carkenord
1 2 3 4
I see the phrase or word-pair "real time" a lot. What does it mean?

Have you heard of the web? Google can find answers sometimes almost in real time:
http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=real+time
Does it mean the same today as it did, say, 10-15 years ago?

It may be expanding from its use in computers and to describe accounts occurring concurrently with happenings or supposed happenings, as in a film in real time, eg Fox's "24".

"He's asking if you killed Freddie Miles and then killed Dickie Greenleaf."
"No, I did not kill Freddie Miles and then kill Dickie Greenleaf." -, "The Talented Mr Ripley"
I see the phrase or word-pair "real time" a lot. What does it mean? Does it mean the same today as it did, say, 10-15 years ago? Thank you.. Lee Carkenord

It's an expression that has been worrying me a little for some thirty years. I think it's generally best to ignore it as a piece of meaningless advertising language: they seem to mean only what broadcasters mean by "live" you see or hear it at the time when it happens. There was back then a camera produced under the name, I think, "Contax RTS", meaning "Real Time Special", and one of the British photo magazines offered it as a prize for somebody who could prove himself best at exploiting the camera's "real time" capabilities; I didn't understand what they were talking about then, and I still don't now. A camera clicks for x/nth of a second, and that's it. Real? Time? I dunno.
Douglas Adams also seems to have found the expression absurd, as in one of his books he has God (also known as Slartibartfast) distracted from his professional work as a planeturge by his voluntary work for "The Campaign for Real Time", laudably trying to stop the devastation caused by people's recent discovery of time travel.

But I once found myself carrying out a more or less accidental experiment in that sort of way as a poet. I lived in a country house whose front consisted almost entirely of tall windows; and once when a striking weather event happened, I sat and wrote rhythmically, watching the weather and noting my feelings and associations. I haven't revised what I wrote in those two or three hours, so it could be called "verse in real time" because it wasn't worked over or "recollected in tranquillity". (It happens that the result was much better than my usual *** though still rubbish, I think.)

Mike.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
I see the phrase or word-pair "real time" a lot. What does it mean? Does it mean the same today as it did, say, 10-15 years ago? Thank you.. Lee Carkenord

Well, I think real time does have an important meaning, but to make Mike happy, I thought I would give you an example I just came across that I can't understand. The word is in the third line from the bottom:
a. The most common cause of crashes and freezes is the email scanning features of many Anti-Virus programs - especially Norton and McAfee. Disabling the email scanning feature generally has no influence upon the effectivity of your Anti-Virus protection - you will still be protected by the program's real time protection. If trying this workaround solves your problems, you now know where to ask for help - ie. your antivirus vendor.
s/ meirman
Posting from alt.english.usage

If you are emailing me please
say if you are posting the same response.
Town NW of Pittsburgh Pa. 0 to 10 years
Indianapolis 7 years
Chicago 6 years
Brooklyn NY 12 years
now in Baltimore 22 years
I see the phrase or word-pair "real time" a lot. What does it mean? Does it mean the same today as it did, say, 10-15 years ago? Thank you.. Lee Carkenord

The dictionary used by the Infoplease.com Web site is the *Random House Unabridged Dictionary,* Copyright 1997, that is, eight years ago. The first definition applies to computers. The following is the second definition for "real time" given in that dictionary:

From
http://www.infoplease.com/ipd/A0617690.html
"*2.* the actual time during which a process takes place or an event occurs."
The dictionary also has an idiom which I had not encountered before:

"*3. in real time,* Informal. at once; instantaneously."

There was "real time" entertainment before programs such as *24*: There were films and plays which occurred in real time that is, films and plays in which, if the action took place in an hour and a half, say, the events being recounted would have taken that long to occur in real life. At some point, a film or theater reviewer would have used the term "real time" in describing such a show, and that would likely have occurred before 1997.

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com
I see the phrase or word-pair "real time" a lot. ... it did, say, 10-15 years ago? Thank you.. Lee Carkenord

Well, I think real time does have an important meaning, but to make Mike happy, I thought I would give ... influence upon the effectivity of your Anti-Virus protection - you will still be protected by the program's real time protection.

Real time protection is protection that is protecting you all the time. As you do something, the system checks that thing to make sure it is safe, in real time. Of course this means your new fancy computer is really slow.

"What do you value in your bulldogs? Gripping, is it not? It's their nature? It's why you breed them? It's so with men. I will not give in because I oppose it. Not my pride, not my spleen, nor any other of my appetites, but *I* do. Is there in the midst of all this muscle no single sinew that serves no appetite of Norfolk's but is just Norfolk? Give that some exercise. Because, as you stand, you'll go before your Maker ill-conditioned. He'll think that somewhere along your pedigree, a *** got over the wall."
-, "A Man For All Seasons"
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
I see the phrase or word-pair "real time" a lot. ... it did, say, 10-15 years ago? Thank you.. Lee Carkenord

It's an expression that has been worrying me a little for some thirty years. I think it's generally best to ... (It happens that the result was much better than my usual *** though still rubbish, I think.) Mike.

In computing settings, "real time" always refers to data transactions initiated and completed as part of one operation. For example, sometimes I email myself something so as to have a copy available in the event my portable storage media fail, and when I hit the send button, my instant messenger advises that I have received a new email before I have time to lift my finger from the return key.

That's an extreme example, but "real time" transaction processing is here contrasted with "batch processing" where the input of data occurs during one cycle of time and the update of relevant storage, transmission and ultimately of display devices occurs at some other predetermined or random moment.
Fran
I see the phrase or word-pair "real time" a lot. ... it did, say, 10-15 years ago? Thank you.. Lee Carkenord

The dictionary used by the Infoplease.com Web site is the *Random House Unabridged Dictionary,* Copyright 1997, that is, eight years ... would have used the term "real time" in describing such a show, and that would likely have occurred before 1997.

*Merriam-Webster's Unabridged,* available via www.m-w.com , is currently running a "FREE Unabridged DayPass" promotion ("No Registration Required!): You first click through some pages advertising *The New York Times.*
I looked up "real time" and this is the entry:
(quote)
Main Entry: real time
Function: noun
*:* the actual time during which something takes place - *real-time* adjective
(end quote)
Citation info: "'real time.' Webster's Third New International Dictionary, Unabridged. Merriam-Webster, 2002.
(6 Jun. 2005)."

Slow-motion photography and time-lapse photography have been around for a long time. MWCD11 dates "real time" to 1953, which leads me to think that it was first used in reference to the output of a computer program, but sometime between then and 1997 (see my comments about the RHUD entry above) someone might have used "real time photography" in contrast to slow-motion or time-lapse photography.

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com
I see the phrase or word-pair "real time" a lot. ... it did, say, 10-15 years ago? Thank you.. Lee Carkenord

It's an expression that has been worrying me a little for some thirty years. I think it's generally best to ... in tranquillity". (It happens that the result was much better than my usual *** though still rubbish, I think.)

I am currently reading a book by F.G.Bailey, a social anthropologist of some distinction, in which he makes a point about time that seems obvious but had not occurred to me before.
His thesis is, as I understand it, that in order to understand the world we need a place to stand (pace Archimedes) and a way of making things stand still. We do this by imposing structures on our experience. One way in which we do this is by converting linear or historical time into what he calls structural time. He uses the passage from Ecclesiastes "To every thing there is a season" to explain his idea of structural time and he argues that we use this reconfiguration of time as cyclical rather than progressive in order to provide order and meaning.

I suppose that the notion of "real time" could be seen as bridging this difference.
Real time for Dr Who would of course be something quite different. I especially enjoyed the discussion in the last episode of why the Tardis appears as an old-fashioned police box and why no-one notices it.

Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Show more