Hi,

The writing below is from a book, and I would like to know what the underlined parts refer to. A name of a game or a name of a stadium.

When I google, "the" Liberty bowl seems like the name of a game because the name of the stadium is "Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium." But at the same time, the Tangerine Bowl also seems like the name of a game whereas the prepositions being used for them are different, in and at.

Would you tell me the meanings of "in the Liberty Bowl" and "at the Tangerine Bowl"?

"I was in Memphis last year when NC State whooped Georgia fourteen to seven in the Liberty Bowl," she said. "And I don't care who's playing, but I want to be sitting front-row center at the Tangerine Bowl.

Thank you,

M
Please forgive all the useless links and typesets in the following pastings:

The Liberty Bowl is an annual U.S. American college football bowl game played in December of each year from 1959 to 2007 and in January in 2009 and 2010. Stadiium:
Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium
Previous stadiumsJohn F. Kennedy Stadium (1959-1963)
Convention Hall (1964)
Previous locationsPhiladelphia, Pennsylvania (1959-1963)
Atlantic City, New Jersey (1964)


The Tangerine Bowl is the original name of the college football bowl game that is currently called the Capital One Bowl . It was known as the Tangerine Bowl from 1947 to 1982. The Capital One Bowl is an annual college football bowl game played in Orlando, Florida at the Citrus Bowl , and previously known as the Tangerine Bowl (1947–1982) and the Florida Citrus Bowl (1983–2002).
StadiumCitrus Bowl
LocationOrlando, Florida
Previous stadiumsFlorida Field (1973)
Previous locationsGainesville, Florida (1973)
Thank you for the reply.

So the both definitely are the names of the games. Would you tell me why one is described "in the Liberty Bowl" while the other is said "at the Tangerine Bowl"?

Thank you,

M
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
NC State whopped Georgia fourteen to seven in the Liberty Bowl [game] -- One team beat the other in the game.

"And I don't care who's playing, but I want to be sitting front-row center at the Tangerine Bowl [event].-- He wants a good seat at the event.
Thank you for the clear explanation. English has much less ambiguity in the language thatn Japanese, seemingly a tiny difference makes a big different. Emotion: sweating

Thank you,

M