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Hi,

The sentences below are from a book, and I have a couple of questions.

1) From the context I can guess what it means but the expression, circuit-court, is a common phrase? If not, what do you say, instead of "circuit-court"?

2)Is there any difference between "move" and "move on" in this context?

It turned out that Agent Samson was something along the lines of a circuit-court speech therapist. She spent four months at our school and then moved on to another.

Thank you,

M
Comments  
1) From the context I can guess what it means but the expression, circuit-court, is a common phrase? -- Yes. They are also called courts of appeals in the US.

2)Is there any difference between "move" and "move on" in this context?-- Not really, but 'move on' suggests a continuing process.
No, circuit-court isn't a common metaphor. If someone doesn't like to be in one place, they may have "wanderlust". Someone who is hired for a short time is a "temp" (temporary employee). I can't think of a common term for someone that repeats a schedule at different locations.

2: No difference, but "moved" sounds more natural when referring to a new home, city, state, etc. While "moved on" sounds more natural for jobs.
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a circuit-court speech therapist - circuit-court is what Mister MC says, a common name for the courts in the US.

speech therapist - don't know if you have watched the movie "The King's Speech", a speech therapist is someone who helps others improve their speaking fluency or overcome speech impairments.

a circuit-court speech therapist is probably someone who works as a speech therapist teaching groups of people (presumably in the justice system) how to become more articulate. Since the number of people are limited, its very possible that once a class is done, the speech therapist will move to another court in a different city to teach other people.
Hi, thank you all for the reply.

I think I should've asked my question clearer.

I know "circuit-court" and "speech therapist" are common words, but I would like to know if "a circuit-court speech therapist" is a normal combination in English. In other words, do you use "circuit-court" to describe a worker who moves on to another place regualry depending on the needs, no matter what his occupation is?

Thank you for your help,

M
do you use "circuit-court" to describe a worker who moves on to another place regualry depending on the needs, no matter what his occupation is?-- No. This is the author's jocularity, as we have already seen with your earlier posts of earlier text in the same book. The author has a speech impediment, and he is recounting with some humour the experiences he has been through.
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Oh, what's why the auther call her Agent Samson here. Damn, I should've been aware of it!

Thank you,Emotion: smile

M