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You've got me.

Can this sentence mean "You've understood me" according to context?
I know this sentence is differently used unlike the meaning I'm expecting from the original sentence, but I'm asking if "You've got me" can mean *"You've understood me"*according to context.

and what about "You've gotten me"?

Can "You've gotten me" mean "You've understood me" as well?

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Can this sentence mean "You've understood me" according to context?

Not really. I just hear the Simple Present.

eg Do you get me?

eg I get you.

and what about "You've gotten me"? I've never heard anyone say this.

Clive

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To Clive

Can "You have got the question" and "You have got me" mean "You have understood the question" and "You have understood me" in these contexts?

For example, if a student asks their teacher whether they've understood the question correctly after the student has explained it to the teacher, and the teacher says "You have got the question", which means "You have understood the question".


For example, if a student asks their teacher whether they've understood what the teacher taught after the student has explained, and the teacher says "You have got me", which means "You have understood me".

I don't really find it natural for the teacher to say that.

To Clive

Can I ask you the reason why they 're not natural?

Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.

I don't remember hearing a teacher say that, or saying it myself. Emotion: smile

To Clive

Thank you very much Clive.

As a last question, can "You've gotten me/the question" mean "You've understood me/the question" in those contexts?

fire1As a last question, can "You've gotten me/the question" mean "You've understood me/the question" in those contexts?

Not in British English.

Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?

I've done my best to tell you not to say that. If you are really determined to say it, you don't need my approval.

Clive

PS - Generally speaking, with all the 'get/got idioms, I don't think people use the gotten form. They just use the 'got' form.