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THERE IS BEHIND MEANING IN THESE SENTENCES AND I CAN NOT FIND IT DESPIDE OF I NOW THE LITERAL MEANING.
WOULD YOU FIND THE MEANING BEHIND THE FOLLOWING STATEMENTS?

1. Emily Bronte who dashed her brain out on the moor or mopped and mowed about the highways crazed with the torture that her gift had put her to.

2. His triumph gave him a monopoly on roman leadership and he took the title of dictator.

3. Alone one is never lonely.

4. Withdraw at the very instant of personal truth for fear of hurting or of being inappropriately present which is to say naked in a social situation.

5. As our creator has designed we should be united by the bond of sympathy, he has strengthened that bond by a proportion able delight.

6. There is no spectacle we so eagerly pursue, as that of some uncommon and grievous calamity.

7. This is not an unmixed delight, but blended with no small uneasiness.

8. All this antecedent to any reasoning by an instinct that works us to its own purposes, without our concurrence.

9. God was proud that week, for the scientific oracle went against him.
Comments  
Which parts do you not understand? I see few idioms.
I DID NOT UNDERSTAND PART 1,3,4,6,8 AND 9
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THERE IS BEHIND MEANING IN THESE SENTENCES AND I CAN NOT FIND IT DESPIDE OF I NOW THE LITERAL MEANING.
There is meaning behind these sentences and I cannot find it despite knowing the literal meaning.

Where are these examples from? Some (1, 8, perhaps 4) are not complete sentences, and many (1, 4, 5, 8) are very awkwardly written. Even the literal meaning of many of the phrases is very unclear.

dashed her brain out on the moor or mopped and mowed about the highways -- ???

for fear of hurting or of being inappropriately present ???

he has strengthened that bond by a proportion able delight. -- Huh?
khoffdashed her brain out on the moor or mopped and mowed about the highways -- ???

The full text is:

"When...one reads of a witch being ducked, of a woman possessed by devils, of a wise woman selling herbs, or even of a very remarkable man who had a mother, then I think we are on the track of a lost novelist, a suppressed poet, of some mute and inglorious Jane Austen, some Emily Bronte who dashed her brains out on the moor or mopped and mowed about the highways crazed with the torture that her gift had put her to. Indeed, I would venture to guess that Anon, who wrote so many poems without signing them, was often a woman."

"dashed her brains out on the moor" means, presumably, committed suicide by throwing herself onto the rocks. Emily Bronte famously wrote Wuthering Heights, which is set on the Yorkshire moors, hence "on the moor".

"to mop and mow" is an old-fashioned expression that means "to look miserable". (At least, I think it's old-fashioned; I don't think I've ever heard it used in real life.)
khoffhe has strengthened that bond by a proportion able delight. -- Huh?

This is just an error in the copying: it should be "proportionable" (= "proportionate").
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khoffand many (1, 4, 5, 8) are very awkwardly written.

No doubt we will find that all the quotes are from "great" authors. It's usually the way!

(Sorry about this piecemal response, Khoff.)
Thanks, Mr. Wordy! I thought perhaps Emily Bronte was so despondent that she gave up writing an opened a housecleaning and yardwork service.