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‎‎‎Can "run up" as a verb be used to imply "run to the full speed"? or run to the full strength or run to the fullest?


For example, in a running competition, when people are shouting "run up" at the runner that they're cheering for , could "run up" imply "run to the full speed" ? or run to the full strength or run to the fullest?


Likewise, can we say "walk up" and "swim up" to imply "walk/swim to the full speed or to the full strength or to the fullest"?


As far as I know, the meaning of "up" can imply "increase in power or speed or anything else", so I think they could imply them in such situations.


I'm really not sure whether you will get the point of my question, though.

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No. we don't say any of those things.

We do say eg

rev up, meaning to make the car engine work faster

gas up meaning to fill the car's tank with gas

speed up meaning go faster

speak up meaning speak louder


I think it's rather idiomatic.

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Preliminary point of grammar: the verb is just "run"; "up" is a separate word, a preposition serving as complement to "run".

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Clive

No. we don't say any of those things.

We do sat eg

rev up, meaning to make the car engine work faster

gas up meaning to fill the car's tank with gas

speed up meaning go faster

speak up meaning speak louder


I think it's rather iidiomatic.

Then, at least in a sports context, is it possible to say "run up" , "swim up", "walk up" to imply or mean accelerating the speed of your ruuning/swimming/walking"?

For example, at the start of a marathon there's a huge pack of runners crowded together, and there's no separation until much later in the race. In such a situation you could conceivably hear:


"Run up to the head of the pack!" (That is: "Get to the first row of runners.")

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Then, at least in a sports context, is it possible to say "run up" , "swim up", "walk up" to imply or mean accelerating the speed of your running/swimming/walking"?

No. I've been doing such sports for years, and I've never said or heard anything like that.

Clive

Clive

Then, at least in a sports context, is it possible to say "run up" , "swim up", "walk up" to imply or mean accelerating the speed of your running/swimming/walking"?

No. I've been doing such sports for years, and I've never said or heard anything like that.

Clive

[We might say "running/swimming/walking up to take the lead" in a race, or "running/swimming/walking up from behind" which means to 'catch up'. These both imply increasing speed.]


Someone just said to me like above.


In the case above, do they really imply increasing speed?

I don't think so.

Even in this case, they do seem just to basically imply approaching.

CliveClive

It's so tricky because "hurry up" can imply increasing the speed of your hurrying, but why "run up" and "walk up" and "swim up" don't imply increasing the speed of your running/walking/swimming?

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'Why' is a hard question.

Is nothing in your native language simply idiomatic (ie we say it that way because we say it that way)?

Clive

 BillJ's reply was promoted to an answer.