Hello to everyone,
I'd really appreicate it if someone could tell me what is the one english word to describe the agricultural land owned by the church, and surrounding it, in medieval Europe. However, I do not mean the "churchyard", for the other land I am talking about was used for agriculture and was considerably vast.
Most appreciatively,

Maysara Omar
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Hello to everyone, I'd really appreicate it if someone could tell me what is the one english word to describe ... not mean the "churchyard", for the other land I am talking about was used for agriculture and was considerably vast.

Glebe.

John Briggs
I'd really appreicate it if someone could tell me what is the one english word to describe the agricultural land ... not mean the "churchyard", for the other land I am talking about was used for agriculture and was considerably vast.

You may find no such word in English (which was not used for government purposes for nearly 300 years after
1066.) Demesne (from French/Latin) may meet yourrequirement for the later period.

Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
(Ottawa, Canada)
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I'd really appreicate it if someone could tell me what is the one english word to describe the agricultural land ... not mean the "churchyard", for the other land I am talking about was used for agriculture and was considerably vast.

It could be "glebe", which the Concise Oxford Dictionary describes as: "A piece of land serving as part of a clergyman's benefice and providing income."

John Hall
"I don't even butter my bread; I consider that cooking." Katherine Cebrian
Hello there, John Briggs and John Hall, and Thank you very much for the word.
But "Glebe" seems to be particular to an "English" church, and at the same time, not particular to the agrarian land.
Perhaps you will say maybe such a word does not exist, but I remember reading it in a book that I unfortunately don't recall which one it was, and its definition in a dictionary that I also do not recall which one it was. The definition described the land as agricultural, attributed its property to the church, and if I remember correctly, all was in the medieval period. However, when I try to recall the sound of that word, it feels quite far from the phonetics of "Glebe".

But anyway, I thank you very much for your help.

Maysara Omar
Hello to everyone, I'd really appreicate it if someone could ... talking about was used for agriculture and was considerably vast.

Glebe.

Goodness. Well done John. I know this word but if I had thought for a week I doubt if it would have come back into memory.
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But "Glebe" seems to be particular to an "English" church, and at the same time, not particular to the agrarian land.

"Glebe (Lat. gleba) originally signified, in common law, any farm, estate, or parcel of land, and the word is so used in the Theodosian Code. But in ecclesiastical law it has become the technical term for land permanently assigned for the maintenance of the incumbent of a parish, and is the oldest form of parochial endowment. This use of the word is found in numerous medieval charters, of which Du Cange gives a few examples, and formerly no church could be consecrated unless thus endowed with a house and glebe."
The Catholic Encyclopedia
http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/06582a.htm
Hello there, John Briggs and John Hall, and Thank you very much for the word. But "Glebe" seems to be particular to an "English" church, and at the same time, not particular to the agrarian land.

au contraire, my father lives in Galashiels, in the Scottish Borders, in Church Street, which backs on to the Glebe.
It's a very common name throughout Scotland, where you will not find many English Kirks (as Anglican churches are called).
How interesting it is to know about that. Thank you so much, Bill.

Maysara Omar
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